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THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 

AND 

CALVIN COLLEGE 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 



1920-1921 







View of Entrance 











YEAR BOOK 




Ur 1 HL 

THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 
and CALVIN COLLEGE 
at GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 

1920-1921 

AN INSTITUTION OF THE 
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH 









CALENDAR 

1921 

Christmas vacation ends January 4 

First semester closes January 21 

Second semester begins January 24 

Day of Prayer March 9 

Anniversary Day March 1 5 

Spring vacation March 25 to April 4 

Commencement June 7 

Summer Vacation 

Entrance examination 9 A. M. September 6 

First semester begins 9 A. M. September 7 

Thanksgiving recess November 24 to 29 

Christmas vacation begins December 23 

1922 

Christmas vacation ends January 2 

First semester closes January 20 

Second semester begins January 23 

Spring vacation March 24 to April 3 

Commencement May 30 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OFFICERS 
1920-1921 

The Rev. J. Manni President 

The Rev. B. H. Einink Secretary 

The Rev. M. Van Vessem Assistant Secretary 



MEMBERS 

CLASSIS GRAND RAPIDS, EAST 

Residence Term Expires 

The Rev. W. P. Van Wyk Grand Rapids, Mich 1924 

The Rev. L. Veltkamp Grand Rapids, Mich 1922 

CLASSIS GRAND RAPIDS, WEST 

The Rev. H. Danhof Kalamazoo, Mich 1 924 

The Rev. W. Stuart Grand Rapids. Mich 1922 

CLASSIS HACKENSACK 

The Rev. D. De Beer Passaic, N. J 1924 

The Rev. J. A. Westervelt Paterson, N. J 1922 

CLASSIS HOLLAND 

The Rev. B. H. Einink Holland, Mich 1924 

The Rev. R. Bolt Holland, Mich 1922 

CLASSIS HUDSON 

The Rev. J. B. Hoekstra Midland Park, N. J 1924 

The Rev. J. Holwerda Paterson, N. J 1922 

CLASSIS ILLINOIS 

The Rev. J. Manni Sheboygan, Wis 1924 

The Rev. F. Doezema Chicago, 111 1922 

CLASSIS MUSKEGON 

The Rev. J. Dolfin Muskegon, Mich 1924 

The Rev. J. L. Heeres Reeman, Mich 1922 

CLASSIS ORANGE CITY 

The Rev. D. Hollebeek Sanborn, Iowa 1924 

The Rev. R. L. Haan, Ph. D Orange City, Iowa 1922 



CLASSIS OSTFRIESLAND 

Residence Term Expires 

The Rev. H. Ahuis Ridott, III 1924 

The Rev. G. L. Hoefker Kanawha, Iowa 1922 

CLASSIS PACIFIC 

The Rev. T. Vander Ark Manhattan, Mont 1924 

The Rev. C. Vriesman Everett, Wash 1922 

CLASSIS PELLA 

The Rev. I. Van Dellen Denver, Colo 1924 

The Rev. J. Mulder Prairie View, Kans 1922 

CLASSIS SIOUX CENTER 

The Rev. J. J. Weersing Hull, Iowa 1922 

The Rev. C. De Leeuw Sioux Center, Iowa 1924 

CLASSIS ZEELAND 

The Rev. M. Van Vessem Zeeland, Mich 1 924 

The Rev. E. J. Krohne Borculo, Mich 1922 

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Rev. L. Veltkamp The Rev. R. Bolt 

The Rev. W. Stuart The Rev. J. L. Heeres 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCES 

The Rev. M. Van Vessem Mr. C. Borrendamme 

The Rev. B. H. Einink Mr. B. J. Jonkman 

Mr. A. H. Bosch Mr. John Hekman - 

Mr. T. Noordewier 

Mr. H. Daane 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDING AND GROUNDS 

The Rev. W. P. Van Wyk Mr. H. Hofstra 

Mr. D. Van Oosten 

EDUCATIONAL SECRETARY 

The Rev. John Vander Mey 847 Sigsbee St., S. E. 

TREASURER 

Mr. J. J. De Jonge 914 Worden Street 

JANITOR 
Mr. E. J. Norden 1 130 Thomas Street 

CLERK 

Catherine Gertrude Dykstra 704 Eastern Avenue, S. E. 



THE THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 



FACULTY 

The Rev. FOPPE M. TEN HOOR, Rector, 

918 Union Ave., S. E. 

Professor of Systematic Theology 

The REV. WILLIAM HEYNS, Registrar, 924 Eastern Ave., S. E. 
Professor of Practical Theology 

The REV. LOUIS BERKHOF, B. D., 834 Worden St., S. E. 
Professor of Exegetical Theology; New Testament 

The REV. RALPH JANSSEN, Ph. D., Theol. Doctorandus 

1242 Logan St., S. E. 

Professor of Exegetical Theology; Old Testament 

The REV. SAMUEL VOLBEDA, Theol. D. 

81 1 Geneva Ave., S. E. 

Professor of Historical Theology 



Prof. Ralph Janssen Librarian 

Mr. RALPH Stob Assistant Librarian 



GENERAL REMARKS 



The Seminar]). — The Seminary is maintained and supervised by the 
Christian Reformed Church, its aim being both to make a scientific 
study of theology and to prepare young men for the ministry. All 
instruction given by the theological professors must be in harmony with 
the standards of the Church, — the Reformed confessional writings. 

Opening. — The school year of 1921 -'22 begins the second week in 
September. On Wednesday, September 7, at 9 A. M., all new students 
must present themselves for matriculation. The formal opening of the 
seminary occurs in the afternoon of Thursday, September 8. 

Admission. — Every person who wishes to matriculate as a student 
of the Seminary must present the following. First, a written testimonial 
from his consistory showing that he is a church member in full commun- 
ion and in good standing; secondly, a diploma showing that he is a 
graduate of the Seminary Preparatory Course of the Theological School 
and Calvin College or that he has completed an equivalent course of 
study elsewhere. Students who are not graduates of the Seminary 
Preparatory Course of our institution must secure special permission to 
be enrolled as students in the Seminary. 

Tuition. — No matriculation fees are charged. The tuition fee is 
fifty dollars a year, to be paid in two installments. For those living 
west of the Mississippi or east of Ohio, tuition is only twenty-five dollars 
per year. Students from Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, 
and from points west of these states, have free tuition. 

Examinations. — Written examinations are held at the close of both 
the first and the second semester. By a ruling of the Synod of 1 920 
the Theological Faculty henceforth decides on the promotion and gradu- 
ation of Seminary students. 

Graduation. — Upon completing the prescribed course of study of 
three years, graduates are awarded a diploma. The graduation fee is 
ten dollars and is to be paid before the final examinations are taken. 

9 



"/trans." — This is a gathering of the students in Theology, occur- 
ring twice a week, at which the Professors of the Seminary preside in 
rotation. The exercises consist of the delivery and criticism of sermons 
and have for their purpose the supplementing of the courses in Practical 
Theology. 

Preaching of Students. — No student of the College or of the first 
year in Theology is permitted to preach. This privilege is granted under 
certain restrictions only to members of the second and third class in 
Theology. 

"Corps." — The students of the Seminary maintain an organization 
called "Corps", its aim being to promote propriety of conduct and man- 
ners, to cultivate Christian character, and to foster scientific and literary 
effort. 

Information. — For further information apply to the rector, Prof. 
F. M. Ten Hoor, 918 Union Avenue, S. E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 



10 



COURSES OF STUDY 



EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY 

Old Testament and New Testament Greek 

PROFESSOR JANSSEN 

Hebrew. — The study of the Hebrew language is begun in the last 
year of the college course and continued through the second year in the 
Seminary. The first year's work in the subject is that covered by 
Harper's Method and Manual and Elements of Hebrew. In the 
Seminary Davidson's Hebrew Grammar is taken up together with the 
reading of portions of the historical or prophetic books for the purpose 
of acquiring a more extended Hebrew vocabulary and familiarity with 
principles of Hebrew syntax. 

Isagog'ics. — Introduction to the canonical Scriptures of the Old 
Testament. A two hour semester course, being a study of the contents, 
of the question of authorship, composition, etc., of the several Old 
Testament books, together with a sketch of the history of Biblical criti- 
cism. 

Sacred History. — The course presupposes familiarity with the main 
facts of the Old Testament record, and deals largely with the more 
important problems of the subject. 

Exegesis. — Interpretation of a portion of the prophetical writings or 
of some of the psalms. Throughout the course emphasis is laid on the 
application of strictly scientific methods in exegetical study. 

New Testament Creek- — Philological interpretation of portions of 
the Gospels or of the Pauline Epistles. 

NEW TESTAMENT 

PROFESSOR BERKHOF 
Isagogics. — Introduction to the canonical Scriptures of the New 
Testament. The several books of the New Testament are studied as to 

11 



their contents, authorship, composition, history, inspiration, and signifi- 
cance in the canon. 

Hermeneutics. — The aim of this course is to give a general survey 
of the history of interpretation, and to discuss the principles, methods, 
and rules that are to be applied in the interpretation of the Bible. 

Exegesis. — Introduction to, and interpretation of, some part of the 
New Testament. This course aims at developing the proper exegetical 
praxis. 

Sacred History. — A general survey is made of the historical facts 
that are recorded in the New Testament, and their import in the history 
of revelation is carefully noted. The work is based on the sources. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY 

PROFESSOR VOLBEDA 

General Church History. — Classes I-III study Mediaeval Church 
History this year. The study of Modern Church History will be taken 
up in 1921-1922. This course seeks to present the history of the 
Christian Church as the background, against which the present life of 
the Church of God, as expressing itself in its condition, thought, and 
activities, must be projected in order to be properly understood and 
correctly appreciated. Text: Williston Walker, A History of the 
Christian Church; and Lectures. 

American Church History. — This course is taken by Class II. Its 
object is to familiarize the student with the experiences through which 
the church of Christ in America has passed, with a view to the attitude 
he should assume toward the various churches with which God brings 
the church of his choice and love into continual contact. Text: L. W. 
Bacon, A History of American Christianity; and Lectures. 

History of the Christian Reformed Church. — This course is based 
upon the assumption that an adequate knowledge of the history of the 
church in which the prospective minister of the Gospel expects to serve 
God is imperative, if he is to discharge the duties of the desired office 
conscientiously, efficiently and acceptably. Text: Henry Beets, De 
Christelijke Gereformeerde Kerk in N. A. ; and Lectures. 

12 



Missionary Science. — This course, taken by classes I-II, comprises 
three distinct divisions, viz., Doctrine of Missions, History of Missions, 
and Theory of Missionary Practice. In the absence, quite generally, of 
regard for the Doctrine of Missions, and with a view to the preponder- 
ance of interest in the historical and practical aspects of missions, the 
dogma or doctrine of missions is made at least proportionately prominent. 
Sound missionary practice requires sound missionary doctrine. The 
latter, based upon God's Word, is the criterion of missionary history and 
the norm of missionary practice. Lectures. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

PROFESSOR TEN HOOR 

Theological Encyclopedia. — The concept, object, principles, and 
contents of Theology as one organic whole. The differentiation and 
organic unity of the divisions and subdivisions. 

The History of Doctrines. — Development of the several doctrines 
in the course of centuries. 

Symbolics. — The various Confessions of Faith. Historically the 
origin of the Confessions of the different churches is traced, and dog 
matically they are compared, and the agreement and difference between 
the various Confessions and our Reformed Standards are pointed out. 
Biesterveld's "Symboliek" is followed in the main. 

Introduction to Dogmatics. — Exposition of the principles of The- 
ology and Religion in general, and of Dogmatics in particular. Com- 
parison and criticism of the different tendencies in Theology, with the 
Bible, which is recognized as the only source of Dogmatics, as criterion. 

Dogmatics. — The aim of this study is to show how the general 
dogmas have been derived from the Holy Scriptures, how they have 
been one sidedly distorted to right or to left, what their Scriptural mean- 
ing is, how they are related and together form one whole, and finally how 
our practice should be determined by these truths. 

Ethics. — While in Dogmatics a study is made of what we should 
believe, in Ethics the aim is to determine how we should be and conduct 
ourselves. The distinction is made clear between philosophical and 
theological Ethics. The contents of the latter are derived from Holy 
Scripture alone. 

13 



PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 

PROFESSOR HEYNS 

Homiletics. — The principles to be observed in order that preaching 
may truly be ministration of the Word; the demands of Rhetoric in the 
composition and delivery of a sermon; the history of preaching; exercises 
in analyzing texts and in making and criticising sermon outlines. 

Catechetics. — History, character, subject-matter, and methods of 
catechetical instruction. 

Liturgies. — Historical study of the forms of Christian worship in 
different periods; public worship and principles according to which it 
should be conducted. 

Poimenics. — Study of the pastoral work required by the Holy 
Scriptures of the minister of the Word, his conduct in house visitation, 
in visitation of the sick, and in special cases. 

Church Polity and Church Government. — Study of the essential 
features, Biblical basis, and historical development of the Presbyterian 
Synodical system of Church Polity ; treatment of our Church Order and 
its amendments, with suggestions relative to their application in practice. 



14 



THE WORK OF THE CLASSES 



Department 



Subjects 



Hours of 


Hours of 


1st Class 


2nd Class 


2 


2 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 




2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


4 


1 


1 


2 






1 


3 


3 


2 


2 




1 




2 



Hours of 
3rd Class 



Exegetical 
Theology 



Historical 
Theology 



Systematic 
Theology 



Practical 
Theology 



Isagogics o 

Hebrew Language 

New Testament Greek 

Hermeneutics 

Exegesis 

Sacred History 

Church History 

Missions 

Theological Encyclopaedia 

The History of Doctrines 

Dogmatics 

Ethics 

Homiletics (Theory and Practice) 

Catechetics 

Liturgies 

Poimenics 

Church Polity and Church 
Government 



X 



15 



THE COLLEGE 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LOCATION 

Grand Rapids, the metropolis of Western Michigan, is an ideal 
college town. Being a city of about 150,000 inhabitants, it is not too 
small to be devoid of those general cultural influences that should sur- 
round an educational institution nor so large as to be a disadvantage to 
the ideal interests of college life. 

Among the many cultural advantages which the city offers and 
from which our students may profit, we may mention first of all the 
Public Library. It is housed in a building that displays true architectural 
art, and has a collection of 1 70,000 books, among which are found 
many standard works of reference; besides, its reading room is supplied 
with nearly all the leading periodicals of this country and with many 
from foreign countries. Further, there is the Kent Scientific Museum, 
which is open daily and can be an efficient help to those interested in 
scientific subjects. In addition to this, the students have the opportunity 
of hearing lectures and addresses by noted men who are invited to the 
city, and of attending concerts, both vocal and instrumental, by some of 
the leading artists of the musical world. 

HISTORY AND CHARACTER OF THE COLLEGE 

The origin of the Theological School and Calvin College dates as 
far back as the year 1861, when the classis of the Holland Reformed 
Church officially recognized the need of training men for the gospel 
ministry. Three years later Rev. D. J. Vander Werp was appointed 
as instructor, and in this capacity he labored in connection with his 
pastoral work till his death in 1876. Not until the appointment in this 
same year of Rev. G. E. Boer as professor, however, did the school 
assume a definite organization. March 15, 1876 was, therefore, its 
natal day. Little by little it grew until in 1 900 it enrolled fifty students 
taught by a staff of five professors. By this time the need of a college 
where young people not looking forward to the gospel ministry could 
receive a Christian liberal education was beginning to be generally felt. 
Accordingly, Synod took active measures toward the expansion of the 

19 



literary department, then consisting of a four year course, into a college. 
From time to time, as means allowed, both the curriculum and the teach* 
ing staff were enlarged so that at present the institution comprises three 
departments: the preparatory school, which furnishes an education equi- 
valent to that of a high school or academy; the college, which offers the 
usual courses leading to the Bachelor's degree; and the seminary, which 
prescribes three years of theological study. 

The institution is supported chiefly by the members of the Christian 
Reformed Church, and is controlled by a Board of Trustees composed 
of two members from each classis. According to the constitution all 
instruction given must be in harmony with Reformed principles. The 
various branches of study, therefore, are considered from the standpoint 
of faith and in the light of Calvinism as a life and world view. The 
aim of the college is to give young people an education that is Christian, 
not merely in the sense that devotional exercises are appended to the 
ordinary work of a college, but in the larger and deeper sense that all 
the class work, all the student's intellectual, emotional and imaginative 
activities shall be permeated with the spirit and teaching of Christianity. 

CAMPUS AND BUILDING 

The new campus, comprising about twelve acres of ground, lies in 
one of the most beautiful residential sections of the city. The site is 
ideal. To the east are two beautiful boulevards and the varied scenery 
surrounding Reed's Lake; at its southeastern corner is a large golf field; 
and across from its southwestern corner lies Franklin Park, a twenty 
acre plot of ground offering splendid opportunity for rest and recreation. 
All around it are residences of the better class. The grounds have been 
decorated by a landscape artist and now, nearly completed, resemble a 
park. 

The main building, erected at a cost of $150,000, is an imposing 
edifice constructed of re-enforced concrete and brick veneer. Thor- 
oughly modern and up-to-date in structure, it is provided with the very 
best equipment for lighting, heating, and ventilation. No expense has 
been spared to supply the building with the latest educational facilities. 
In the high and well lighted basement are two waiting rooms, two class 
rooms, the reading room and library, and the physical laboratory; con- 
nected with the basement but in a separate building, is the chemical 
laboratory; on the main floor are found the administrative offices, com- 
mittee room, faculty room, biological laboratory, four lecture rooms, 

20 



and the auditorium, with a seating capacity of seven hundred twenty-five 
people; on the second floor are ten lecture rooms and the balcony of the 
auditorium. 

LIBRARY 

The library is daily open to the students. The books are catalogued 
according to the Dewey system. Card catalogues, which greatly increase 
the usefulness of the library, have been prepared. Owing to the liber- 
ality of Mrs. E. V. De Jong, the library is in possession of a handsome 
endowment fund, the interest of which is annually available for the pur- 
chase of books. There is still, however, great need of enlarging it, and 
gifts in the form of extra books or money are highly welcome. 

LABORATORIES 

The physical laboratory, which is modern in every respect, contains 
ten laboratory tables, each accommodating four students. These tables 
are equipped with double gas cocks, two nickel-plated electric plugs, 
adjustable metal uprights and cross bars, and four large drawers. In 
addition to these there are two balance tables, each long enough to sup- 
port four scales, and two work tables fitted with double gas cocks and 
pantry cocks for hot and cold water and providing working space for 
several students at one time. Dust proof apparatus cases fitted with 
glass doors, adjustable shelves, and capacious drawers furnish ample 
room for the storing and displaying of physical apparatus. A special 
photometric room containing an up-to-date photometry room desk on 
which students perform experiments with optical benches and photo 
meters and a separate stock room for storing apparatus and chemicals 
complete the physical laboratory. The physical lecture room is pro- 
vided with a stereopticon outfit. 

The chemical laboratory is a separate building but connected with 
the main structure. Three double chemistry desks fitted with double 
re-agent shelves, six double long spout gas cocks, and an equal number 
of compression water cocks accommodate forty-eight students working 
in sections of twenty-four. Four fume hoods of practical construction 
and design and furnished with stone sink and gas cock have been in- 
stalled. An electric exhaust fan removes all obnoxious odors from the 
hood. Re-agent cases fitted with adjustable shelves are conveniently 
placed so that the student loses little time in walking back and forth to 
them. The two balance tables are attached to the outside wall in order 

21 



to reduce vibration to a minimum. Their lengths allow the placing of 
six balances, leaving sufficient working area around each. 

The biological laboratory consists of the main laboratory, a plant 
conservatory, a stock room, and a private laboratory or dissecting room. 
It is well lighted naturally by twelve windows on the south and east 
sides and artificially by electric lamps distributed throughout the rooms. 
The main laboratory contains ten student tables each furnished with an 
acid proof top, eight drawers, and four microscope cupboards fitted with 
individual lock and key; an instructor's demonstration table provided 
with gas, electricity, water, and a stone sink; three cases for demonstra- 
tion material and apparatus; a student's chemistry work table with a re- 
agent shelf, overhead gas and water cocks, and a lead-lined waste-water 
trough, and stone sink; a student's preparation supply table and cabinet; 
a copper gauze live cage with twelve compartments for living terrestrial 
animals ; three large Alberene Stone and glass aquaria for living aquatic 
animals ; and a histology table and cabinet furnished with electricity, gas, 
water, and a stone sink for the staining and mounting of microscopic 
objects. The plant conservatory is supplied with water and has a cement 
floor with drainage opening for waste water. In it there is a starting- 
table which has more than one hundred square feet of lead-lined, self- 
drained, germinating beds, and a soil bin of two compartments lined 
with galvanized iron. The stock room contains four cases in which are 
stored apparatus, preserved plants and animal material, chemical re- 
agents in bulk, charts, models, etc. The teacher's private laboratory or 
dissecting room has also a complete equipment. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The young men of both College and Seminary maintain a literary 
society called "Corps", which, because of its large membership, has 
been split into four divisions. The young women have two societies ; the 
Literary Society for the girls of the Preparatory School, and the Sorosis 
for the girls of the College. 

For the purpose of carrying on special study in subjects in which 
groups of students are interested, several clubs have been organized. 
Those existing at present are the Calvinistic Club, the Philosophical 
Club, the Historical Club, the Open Forum Club, the Oratorical Club, 
the Dramatic Club, and the French Club. In addition to these there 
are several class clubs, the aim of which is to foster esprit de corps and 
to promote the best interests of the respective classes. 

22 



The Glee Club is composed of sixteen male voices, and is trained 
by a competent musical director. By its acceptable singing this organi- 
zation has become a favorite with the public. A Girls' Glee Club and 
a Student Band have been organized recently. 

The Student Volunteer Band is maintained by those students who 
are specially interested in the cause of missions. Special study is made 
of missionary history and practice. The Girl's Mission Society and the 
City Mission Band also furnish opportunity for the study and practice 
of mission work. 

An association composed of all student subscribers publishes "Calvin 
College Chimes", a monthly that serves as an organ for the literary ex- 
pression of the life and the ideals of the student body. During the 
twelve years of its existence this periodical has gained for itself an 
honorable record. 

"Aurora", a general society of the student body, has gained much 
favor during the past year. It has met with whole-hearted support in 
its attempt to foster and guide social life among the students. 

LECTURE COURSE 
For a number of years past a lecture course has been successfully 
maintained by the students. In addition there is abundant opportunity 
for students to avail themselves of lectures and addresses by men of note 
who are invited to address different organizations of this city. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association, composed of the graduates of both Semi- 
nary and College, aims to promote the interests of both Alma Mater and 
alumni. Attempts are made at present by the Alumni (ae) to raise 
$100,000 for the Million Dollar Endowment Fund. 

EXPENSES 

The tuition fee is $25.00 per semester; for two from the same 
family, $16.50 each; no further reduction is made in case more than 
two from the same family attend. Further, those living west of the 
Mississippi and east of Ohio, will be required to pay only one-half of 
this amount; while those coming from Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, 
New Mexico, and points west of these states will be permitted to attend 
free of charge. The tuition fee must be paid to the treasurer on the 
day of registration in September and in February. 

In some laboratory courses an extra fee will be charged to cover 
cost of material, wear and tear of instruments, etc. The laboratory fees 

23 



must be paid before the corresponding courses are begun. See de- 
scription of these courses for the amount of fees. 

The examination fee in the Preparatory School is five dollars. The 
same fee is charged at the completion of any College Course. These 
fees must be paid before admission to the final examination. 

Board and room, fuel and light, in good families, is furnished for 
seven dollars a week and upward. 

Expenses, including board, room rent, fuel, light, washing and 
text books, are from four hundred dollars up. 

MAINTENANCE AND ENDOWMENTS 

For these the School is indebted largely to the kind and generous 
support of the members of the Christian Reformed Church. From year 
to year, with the growing of the church, the contributions have become 
larger and have met the demands of the School, while it has in turn 
supplied the church with pastors who have shown themselves pious and 
active workers for the cause of Christ. 

The interest accruing from an Endowment Fund of several thousand 
dollars also contributes to the support of the school. 

The College is greatly in need of a larger endowment, a gymnasium, 
and a new dormitory, and bequests are, therefore, very welcome. Should 
there be any among the friends of this school whom God has richly 
blessed with means, may they remember that no money is so well in- 
vested as that which is invested in an institution that gives young people 
a Christian education, in souls and lives rather than in material things. 
The Church, the state, and society depend upon Christian colleges and 
seminaries for leaders and workers; hence, money expended for the 
support of such institutions is money spent for the advancement of the 
Kingdom of God upon earth. 

LEGAL FORM OF BEQUEST 
I hereby give, devise, and bequeath unto Theological School and 
Calvin College, a corporation organized and existing under the laws of 

the State of Michigan, the sum of Dollars, 

to be paid out of any real or personal estate owned by me at my decease. 

INFORMATION 

The President will be glad to furnish all possible information with 
reference to the Preparatory School and College. More particularly 
those desiring private boarding places should apply to Professor Van 
Haitsma. Correspondence is cordially invited. 

24 



REGULATIONS 



DIPLOMAS 

The School issues diplomas as follows: 

To those who have completed the work required for graduation in 
the Preparatory School. These diplomas, that of the Teacher's Course 
excepted, admit, without examination, to the University of Michigan, 
as well as to our own College Department. 

To those who have finished the required number of hours of work 
in the College Department. See also under the heading, "Courses of 
Study — The College." 

To those who have finished the three years' course in Theology. 

To those who have finished one year in Theology and the seven year 
Seminary Preparatory course the degree of Bachelor of Arts will be 
granted. 

When no full course is completed, a statement is given of the studies 
in which the students passed examination. 

No diploma will be granted for less than one year's resident work, 
which ordinarily must be the year immediately preceding the granting 
of the diploma. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS 

The school year of thirty-six weeks is divided into two semesters 
of eighteen weeks each. 

Two vacations are given during the year: A vacation of two 
weeks at the Christmas holidays, and a spring vacation of one week. 
Students are required to remain on duty until the last school exercise 
preceding a vacation is completed, and to be present at the hour of 
opening, after a vacation. 

RELIGIOUS CULTURE 

All students are obliged to attend the devotional exercises held in 
the auditorium at 8 A. M. Religious instruction, either doctrinal or 
historical, is compulsory for all classes. 

On the Sabbath every student is supposed to worship regularly with 
some church of his own selection. 

25 



Every student is visited by some professor at least once in a school 
year. The object of this visit is not only to speak with the student 
about methods of study, difficulties encountered in the work, habits of 
living, but especially to be a help to him in his spiritual life. The 
college believes that the religious as well as the intellectual side of a 
student's life should receive due attention. 

ADMISSION AND ADVANCED STANDING 

Applicants for admission are accepted on the presentation of a 
certificate from an accredited school testifying that they have finished the 
work of the eighth, ninth, and tenth grades or its equivalent. In ex- 
ceptional cases, promising young men of mature years, who desire to 
study for the ministry, but have not had the required preliminary train- 
ing, may be admitted as specials. All applicants must, however, present 
a satisfactory written testimonial of good moral conduct. Those who 
intend to study for the ministry must in addition present a recommenda- 
tion from their consistory. 

Candidates for advanced standing will be placed in the highest 
class for which they seem fit. No credit, however, will be given for 
subjects taken elsewhere, until a student has shown, during the first 
semester in attendance, ability to keep up with his work. 

Students who come from other schools and present branches of 
study different from those taught at our school may receive credit for 
such, provided these are subjects of equal educational value. 

All testimonials, certificates, or records of work done elsewhere 
should be presented on the day when the candidate applies for admis- 
sion. Students expecting advanced credit for work done at other insti- 
tutions should bring full credentials. 

After a student has enrolled for a study, he may not drop it without 
permission from the Dean; neither may he change his course of study 
without such permission. 

Students who are not candidates for graduation may, in as far as the 
schedule of recitation allows, take such studies as their preparation quali« 
fies them to pursue with profit. Bible study, however, must be taken 
by every student. 

The regular time for admission is at the beginning of the school 
year in September, and at the beginning of the second semester in 
January. During the school year, however, the Faculty has the right 
to accept students that meet the requirements. 

26 



DISMISSION 

Students are amenable to the regulations of the school from the 
time of their arrival. As soon as a student's conduct becomes detri- 
mental to his own or the school's best interest, the Faculty will suspend 
him after due warning, and, in case no improvement results, the with- 
drawal of such a student may be required. 

EXAMINATIONS 

The examinations are held at the close of the first and second 
semesters. A literal system is used in grading the work as follows: 

Honor Points Mark Equivalent 

3 A — Excellent or Exceptional 

A- 

B+ 

2 B — Good or Very Good 

B- 

C + 
1 C — Graduation Average 

C- 

D + 

D — Unsatisfactory 

-1 E — A Condition which may be removed at a re-examination 

-2 F — Failure. No re-examination 

Inc. — Work not completed. 

Conditions received in January, as well as in June, may be removed 
only at the supplementary examination held for that purpose on the first 
Monday and Tuesday after the Spring vacation or on the first Friday 
and Saturday of the school year. If a student fails to remove his condi- 
tion at the re-examination immediately following the time when the 
condition was received, the subject will have to be repeated for credit. 
Incompletes should be removed on or before the dates set for re-exami- 
nation: if not removed on or before that date the incomplete becomes 
an "F". 

Any student whose grade is "F" can obtain credit for the course 
only by repeating it in class. A student whose grade is "E" is allowed 
one re-examination on the work of the course, for which he receives 
credit if the re-examination is passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

What course is to be pursued in the case of a student who is not 
prepared for more advanced work is to be determined jointly by the 
Dean and the instructor of the subject. 

Report cards are sent out at the end of each semester. 

27 



THE FACULTY 

THE REV. JOHN J. HIEMENGA, A. M., B. D., President 

Bible Study 

946 Watkins Street. 

ALBERTUS ROOKS, A. M., Dean 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature 
737 Benjamin Avenue. 

KLAAS SCHOOLLAND 

Professor of the Greefy Language and Literature 
854 Worden Street. 

JACOB G. VANDEN BOSCH, A. M. 

Professor of the English Language and Literature 
857 Bates Street. 

THE REV. WILLIAM HEYNS 
Bible Study 
1319 Sigsbee Street. 

ALBERT E. BROENE, A. B., Secretary 
Professor of Modern Languages 
1227 Sherman Street. 

*WILLIAM RINCK, A. M., Registrar 
Professor of Mathematics 
530 Norwood Avenue. 

THE REV. LOUIS BERKHOF, B. D. 

Professor of Biblical Archaeology 
834 Worden Street. 

JOHANNES BROENE, A. M. 
Professor of Education 
1044 Bates Street. 

JOHN P. VAN HAITSMA, A. M. 
Professor of Organic Sciences 
1 150 Kalamazoo Avenue. 



*Died November 11, 1920. 

28 



RALPH JANSSEN, Ph. D., Theologiae Doctorandus 
Professor of Hebrew 
1242 Logan Street. 

JAMES NIEUWDORP, B. S. 

Professor of Chemistry 
900 Benjamin Avenue. 

HENRY J. G. VAN ANDEL, A. M. 

Professor of the Holland Language and Literature 
1 000 Bates Street. 

PETER HOEKSTRA, Ph. D. 

Professor of History 
1033 Sheldon Avenue. 

RALPH STOB, A. B. 

Assistant Professor of Greek; in charge of Public Speaking 
1 335 Thomas Street. 

*HENRY J. RYSKAMP, A. M. 

Professor of Sociology and Economics 

WILLIAM HARRY JELLEMA, A. M. 

Professor of Philosophy 
954 Dunham Street. 

JACOB OLTHOFF, A. B. 
Professor of Physics 
1018 Baxter Street 

REESE VEATCH 

Instructor in Music and Director of the Chorus 

NELLY JEANETTE BOSMA 
Assistant in Biology 



* Absent on leave during 1920-1921. 

29 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Boarding Places and Dormitory — Van Haitsma, Nieuwdorp. 

Discipline — Hiemenga, Rooks, Schoolland. 

Educational Policy and Course of Study — Hiemenga, Rooks, J. Broene, 

Hoekstra, Nieuwdorp. 
Lectures and Public Entertainments — Stob, Van Andel, Jellema. 
Library — A. E. Broene, Stob. 
Missions and Religious Culture — Schoolland, Vanden Bosch, A. E. 

Broene. 
Normal Training — J. Broene, Van Haitsma. 
Athletics — Hiemenga, Hoekstra, Olthoff. 
Publications — Vanden Bosch, A. E. Broene, Olthoff. 
Societies — Hiemenga, Van Andel, Stob, Jellema. 
Supplies — Nieuwdorp, Van Haitsma. 



30 



COURSES OF STUDY 



Students who do not wish to register in any of the courses outlined 
are required to present the following credits for the A. B. degree: 

Bible Study, 8 hours* 

Rhetoric, 6 hours 

History, 6 hours 

Psychology and Logic, 6 hours 

Philosophy, 6 hours. 

German or French, 1 2 hours. 

Science, 10 hours, a total of 54 hours. 

The remaining 66 hours may be selected from the following three 
groups, subject to the restrictions indicated: 

Group I. Ancient Languages and Literature, Modern Languages 
and Literature, Rhetoric and English, Public Speaking. 

Group II. Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Zoology, Botany, 
Psychology, and Logic. 

Group III. History, Economics, Sociology, Political Science, 
Philosophy, and Education. 

Restrictions : 

( 1 ) Each student must choose a major and minor group. In his 
major group he must take four semester courses of three hours each, in 
two departments. In his minor group he must take jour semester courses 
of three hours each, in one department. 

(2) The maximum number of hours which a student may take 
within a department is forty; the minimum is twenty-four for the major 
group and twenty for the minor group. 



*An hour of credit is given when a study has been satisfactorily pursued with 
one recitation per week for one semester. 

31 



SEMINARY PREPARATORY COURSE 





First Semester 


Second Semester 


c 


Greek 4* 




H 


English 3 




CO 


Latin 3 


Same as 




History 3 

Public Speaking 2 

Bible Study 1 


First Semester 




First Semester 


Second Semester 




Greek 3 




(0 


Latin 3 







Dutch 3 or 


Same as 


E 




Elective 3 


First Semester 




History 3 or 





C/1 


Sociology 3 

Psychology and Logic 3 
Public Speaking 1 
Bible Study 1 






First Semester 


Second Semester 




Greek 3 


Greek 3 


M 

o 


History of Philosophy 3 


History of Philosophy 3 


'S 


German 4 


German 4 


s 


Dutch History 3 


Dutch Literature 3 




Elective 3 


or Elective 3 




Bible Study 1 


Elective 3 (continued) 
Bible Study 1 




First Semester 


Second Semester 


(A 


Advanced Philosophy 3 


Advanced Philosophy 3 




'5 


Hebrew 3 


Hebrew 3 


4> 
CO 


German 3 


German 3 




Greek 3 


Greek 3 




Elective 3 


Elective 3 




Biblical Achaeology 1 


Biblical Achaeology 1 



The above course is prescribed for those wishing to be admitted 
to the Seminary. The completion of this course entitles the candi- 
date to the A. B. degree. 

* The figure indicates the number of recitations per week. 



32 



Three-year Pre-Medical Course 





First Semester 


Second Semester 


a 


Rhetoric 3 




E 


Modern Language 4 


Same as 


to 




Chemistry 4 


First Semester 


u 


Zoology and Botany 4 
Bible Study 1 






First Semester 


Second Semester 


N 
0) 


English 3 







Psychology 2 




B 


Physics 3 


Same as 




Zoology and Botany 4 


First Semester 



CO 


Modern Language 4 
Bible Study 1 






First Semester 


Second Semester 


M 

h 

o 


Physics 4 


Physical Chemistry 4 


'S 


Chemistry 4 


Advanced Psychology 4 


3 


Modern Language 4 


Modern Language 4 




Elective 3 


Elective 3 




Bible Study 1 


Bible Study 1 



Upon completion of this course and one year of work in medicine 
at a recognized medical school, the candidate will be granted the A. B. 
degree from Calvin College. 

Two-year Pre-Engineering Course 





First Semester 


Second Semester 


c 


Rhetoric 3 


Rhetoric 3 


E 


Modern Language 4 


Modern Language 4 




Analytic Geometrjr 4 


Analytic Geometry 4 


U. 


General Chemistry 4 


Qualitative Analysis 4 




Bible Study 1 


Bible Study 1 


<o 


First Semester 


Second Semester 


2 



English Literature 3 




S 


Modern Language 4 




a, 




Calculus 4 


Same as 


Physics 5 


First Semester 




Bible Study 1 





The completion of the above course, plus three years of work 
taken at a recognized school of engineering, should enable one to 
finish the regular engineering course. 

33 



Three-year Pre-Law Course 





First Semester 


Second Semester 




Rhetoric 3 




c 

ft) 


Latin 3 




E 


Mathematics or Science 3 




(0 


History 3 


Same as 




Shakesperian Reading and 

Public Speaking 3 
Bible Study 1 


First Semester 




First Semester 


Second Semester 


w 


English Literature 3 




0) 


Latin 3 or 






£ 


Modern Language 4 







History 3 


Same as 


a 




Sociology 3 


First Semester 


en 


Psychology 3 
Bible Study 1 






First Semester 


Second Semester 


(0 


Rhetoric 3 







English History 3 




'S 

3 


Political Science 3 


Same as 


»-> 


Electives 6 or V 
Bible Study 1 


First Semester 



Upon completion of this course and one year of work in law at 
a recognized law school, the candidate will be granted the A. B. de- 
gree from Calvin College. 



34 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



Each course runs for one semester. Courses marked with an odd 
number are given during the first semester; courses marked with an even 
number during the second. 

BIBLE STUDY AND DOCTRINE 

PROFESSORS HEYNS, BERKHOF, STOB, AND THE PRESIDENT 

(Courses 1 to 4 are given in Dutch and are intended for students 
pursuing the Seminary Preparatory course; courses 5 to 8 are given in 
English for students in other courses.) 

1. Reformed Doctrine: The Doctrine of the Mediator; the 
Doctrine of the Dispensation of Grace. Text: Heyns' Gereformeerde 
Geloofsleer. One hour a week. Professor Heyns. 

2. Reformed Doctrine: Continuation of Course 1. One hour 
a week. Professor Heyns. 

3. Reformed Doctrine: The Doctrine of the Application of 
Grace; the Doctrine of the Last Things. Text: Heyns' Gereformeerde 
Geloofsleer. One hour a week. Professor Heyns. 

4. Reformed Doctrine: Continuation of Course 3. One hour a 
week. Professor Heyns. 

5. Reformed Doctrine: In this and in courses 6, 7, 8 the aim is 
a meaningful interpretation of Reformed belief. Discusses the Doc- 
trine of the Mediator, and the Dispensation of Grace. Term papers. 
Text: Bosma's Exposition of Reformed Doctrine. One hour a week. 
Professor Stob. 

6. Reformed Doctrine: Continuation of Course 5. One hour a 
week. Professor Stob. 

7. Reformed Doctrine: Takes up the last two divisions of Re- 
formed Doctrine, that of the Means of Grace, and that of the Last 
Things. Term papers. Text: Bosma's Exposition of Reformed Doc- 
trine. One hour a week. Professor Stob. 

8. Reformed Doctrine: Continuation of Course 7. One hour a 
week. Professor Stob. 

35 



9. Biblical Archaeology: For Seniors taking the Seminary Pre- 
paratory course. Two hours a week. Professor Berkhof. 

1 0. Studies in Calvinism : A discussion of Calvinism and its in- 
fluence and application in religion, education, society, politics, ethics, 
and art. Lectures, assigned reading, and papers by the class. For 
Juniors. One hour a week. The President. 

GREEK 

PROFESSOR SCHOOLLAND, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR STOB 

1. Beginners' Greek. Text: Burgess and Bonner. Elementary 
Greek. Lessons I to XXX. Four times a week. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Stob. 

2. Beginners' Greek. Continuation of Course I. Lessons XXX 
to LX. Four times a week. Assistant Professor Stob. 

3. Xenophon's Cyropaedia, book I. Xenophon considered as 
historian. The literary class and historical value of this work. Three 
hours a week. Professor Schoolland. 

4. Homer's Iliad, book I and portion of book XXIV. Epic 
poetry; Homer and Hesiod. Study of the hexameter. Three hours a 
week. Professor Schoolland. 

5. (a) Pearson's Greek Composition is studied the first few 
weeks. Final test December 7. 

(b) Plato's Euthyphro. Three hours a week. Professor 
Schoolland. 

6. Lysias: Orations. Short introductory talks on the Age of 
Pericles and the Peloponnesian Wars; the Reign of the Four Hundred; 
the Downfall of Athens; the Thirty Tyrants. Brief survey of the life 
and business of the Lysias family. To read: Oration XII Against 
Eratosthenes, and Oration XVI For Mantitheus. Three hours a week. 
Professor Schoolland. 

7. (a) Introductory lectures on Pre-Socratic philosophy, with final 
test December 1 . 

(b) Plato's Protagoras. Three hours a week. Professor 
Schoolland. 

8. (a) An outline of Greek literature in short talks, supplemented 
by the study of Jebb's Creek Literature. Final test in the latter part of 
February. 

(b) Aeschylus' Prometheus. Three hours a week. Professor 
Schoolland. 

36 



LATIN 

PROFESSOR ROOKS 

A. 1 and 2. Elementary Preparatory Latin and Caesar. These 
courses, running through the year, cover the first two units for entrance 
to College and are intended for those who have taken no Latin in their 
High School course. Hours to be arranged. 

B. 1 and 2. Cicero, Selected Orations. Either semester. This 
course is offered for those students who have had only two years of 
Latin. Hours to be arranged. 

1 . Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses. Parts of books 1 to 
3 of Virgil's Aeneid. Three times a week. 

2. Continuation of Course 1 . Books 4 to 6 of Virgil's Aeneid. 
In this course as in the preceding one, attention is given to the personal, 
national and religious elements found in the Aeneid in relation to the 
three fold policy of Augustus. Both courses are illustrated with slides. 
Three times a week. 

3. Cicero's De Senectute; Selected Letters of Pliny, with a study 
of the political, social and moral condition of Rome during the first 
century after Christ. Three times a week. (1921 -'22.) 

4. Germania of Tacitus; Confessions of Augustine. Three times 
a week. (1921 '22.) 

5. Cicero's De Amicitia; Selected Letters of Cicero, with a study 
of the political, social and moral condition of Rome during the century 
preceding the birth of Christ. Three times a week. (1922-'23.) 

6. Suetonius; Julius and Augustus Caesar. Confessions of Aug- 
ustine. Three times a week. (1922-'23.) 

7. Selections from Roman Historical Literature: Livy, Sallust, 
Cicero. Twice a week. 

8. Cicero's Tuscular Disputations or Selected plays of Plautus or 
Terence. Twice a week. 

9. Private Life of the Romans. A Lecture Course. Illustrated 
with slides. Two years of Latin a prerequisite. The course deals with 
such subjects as these: The family, marriage and the position of 
women; children and education; travel and correspondence; sources of 
income and means of living. Twice a week. 

1 0. A study of the ancient writing material. Introduction to Latin 
Paleography. A lecture course illustrated with slides. Twice a week. 

1 1 . Teachers' Course. This course and course 1 2 are particularly 
for those who contemplate teaching Latin. A study of the methods of 

37 



teaching Latin. Review of the fundamentals of Latin Grammar. Prac- 
tice in Latin writing. Interpretation of Caesar's Gallic War. One 
hour a week. 

1 2. Teachers' Course. Continuation of Course 1 1 but Course 1 1 
is not necessarily a prerequisite. Courses 1 1 and 1 2 should be pre- 
ceded at least by Courses 1 and 2, 3 and 4, or 5 and 6. One hour a 
week. 

DUTCH STUDIES 

PROFESSOR VAN ANDEL 

1 . History of Dutch Literature up to 1 700. Special study is made 
of some of the mediaeval classics and of some poets of the seventeenth 
century. The general character of the Middle Ages and the Renais- 
sance, of the Golden Age, and of the Pseudo-classical period is dis- 
cussed. Three times a week. (1920-'21). 

2. History of Dutch Literature after 1 880. Discussion of Natur- 
alism and Futurism in modern Holland and Flemish Literature. As- 
signed reading and composition. Three times a week. (1920-'21 ). 

3. History of the Netherlands up to 1 700. Special emphasis is 
laid upon the character and development of Calvinism in Holland. 
Collateral reading, and term papers. Three times a week. (1921 -'22). 

4. History of the Netherlands after 1 700. The contribution of 
Holland to the world's civilization and its re-awakening after 1813 in 
respect to culture and Calvinism receive due attention. Collateral read- 
ing and class exercises. Three times a week. (1921 -'22). 

5. Flemish Painting. A course in the development of Flemish 
painting from the mediaeval miniaturists to Rubens and Van Dyck. 
The method will be analytical as well as historical. Instruction is 
based on reproductions of paintings with supplementary readings. Three 
times a week. (1921 -'22). 

6. Dutch Painting. Emphasis will be laid on the work of the 
masters of the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. Instruction is 
based on reproductions of paintings with supplementary readings. The 
course on Flemish painting is a prerequisite to this course. Three times 
a week. (1921 -'22). 

7. Dutch Classics. This course is intended for students who 
desire to become acquainted with Dutch classics, but who have not an 
understanding of the Dutch language sufficient to read the original 
works. The classics will be read in translations. The readings will be 

38 



supplemented by a rapid review of Dutch Literature. Once a week. 
(1921-72). 

8. Continuation of Course 7. Once a week. 

ENGLISH 

PROFESSOR VANDEN BOSCH 

1 . Composition and Rhetoric. Required of all freshmen. Thrice 
a week. 

2. Continuation of Course 1. Exposition and the Short-Story. 
Thrice a week. 

3. American Literature up to 1 860. Thrice a week. 

4. American Literature since 1860. Thrice a week. 

5. The Elizabethan, the Puritan, and the Classical periods. 
Thrice a week. 

6. The Romantic movement. Thrice a week. 

7. The Victorian period. Thrice a week. 

8. The Victorian period continued. Thrice a week. 

9. Contemporary fiction, drama, poetry, and essays. Twice a 
week. (1920-'21). 

1 0. Continuation of Course 9. Thrice a week. 

1 1 . Argumentation and debating. Two hours a week. ( 1 92 1 - 
'22.) 

12. Advanced Rhetoric. Two hours a week. (1921 -'22.) 

FRENCH 

PROFESSOR A. E. BROENE 

1 . Elementary Course. Grammar, pronunciation, composition, 
dictation. Conversation with a view to training the ear to understand 
spoken French. Four times a week. 

2. Continuation of Course 1 . Reading of De Monvert La belle 
France or equivalent. Four times a week. 

3. Intermediate Course. Review of grammar with special em- 
phasis on the more important parts. Reading of modern prose. Three 
times a week. 

4. Continuation of Course 3. Reading of representative authors 
of 1 9th Century. Composition. Assigned reading and reports. Three 
times a week. 

5. The Modern Period. Survey of the 19th Century literature. 
Three times a week. (1921 -'22.) 

39 



6. The Modern Drama. Three times a week. (1921 -'22.) 

7. The Classic Period. Three times a week. (1922-'23.) 

8. Continuation of Course 7. Three times a week. (1922-'23.) 

GERMAN 

PROFESSOR A. E. BROENE 

1 . Elementary Course. Grammar and composition. Reading 
of modern prose calculated to build up a fair reading vocabulary and 
to give the student some knowledge of German life and institutions. 
Four times a week. 

2. Continuation of Course 1 . Four times a week. 

3. Intermediate Course. Review of grammar. Reading of mod- 
ern authors. Composition. Outside reading with reports. Three times 
a week. 

4. Continuation of Course 3. As far as practicable the work in 
the classroom is carried on in German throughout the year. Three 
times a week. 

5. History of Literature of the 19th Century. Romantic Move- 
ment. Three times a week. (1920-'21.) 

6. Continuation of Course 5. Realism. Three times a week. 
(1920-'21.) 

7. The Classic Period. A general survey of the literature of the 
18th Century. Three times a week. (1921 -'22.) 

8. The Classic Drama. Three times a week. (1921 '-22). 

9. The Drama of the 19th Century. Study of representative 
plays by Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel and Hauptmann. Three times a 
week. (1922-73.) 

10. Continuation of Course 9. Three times a week. (1922-'23.) 

HEBREW 

PROFESSOR JANSSEN 

1 . Elementary Course. The work is that covered by Harper's 
Method and Manual and the Elements of Hebrew. Three times a 
week. 

2. Continuation of Course 1 . Three times a week. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

PROFESSOR STOB 
1 . Writing of orations to develop the clear, direct and forceful 
style necessary for public address. Delivery of orations before the 

40 



class. Memorization of selections. Study of H. G. Houghton's Ele- 
ments of Public Speaking. Once a week. 

2. Continuation of Course 1 . Once a week. 

3. Writing of orations. Suggestions made with regard to holding 
of interest, the aim of public speaking, etc. Once a week. 

4. Continuation of Course 3. Once a week. 

5. Selections from Moulton's Modern Reader's Bible. Reading 
of speeches of great orators; discussion of their qualities. Once a week. 

6. Continuation of Course 5. Once a week. 

MUSIC 

MR. VEATCH 
1 . History of Music. The development of the art of music 
from primitive times to the present. Oratorio and church music, the 
art song, the opera, and instrumental music. Biographies of composers. 
Standard compositions presented in class to stimulate intelligent appre- 
ciation. Note book work. Text: Boltzell. Two hours a week. 
Semester fee $5.00. 

3. Singing: Individual lessons for the development of the voice 
and the memorizing of a repertoire of sacred and secular art songs and 
arias from the great oratorios and operas. One lesson each week. 
Semester fee $18.00. 

4. Singing: Continuation of Course 3. One lesson each week. 
Semester fee $18.00. 

HISTORY 

PROFESSOR HOEKSTRA 

1. Western Europe since 1815. The political and economic 
reconstruction of Europe after the Napoleonic wars. The revolutionary 
movements of 1848, the narrative history of France and Italy to 1870. 
Lectures and collateral reading. Text: Robinson and Beard, Develop- 
ment of Modern Europe. Three times a week. (1920-'21.) 

2. Western Europe since 1815. A continuation of course 1. 
France and Italy since 1870. Germany since 1815 with special em- 
phasis upon German unification, the rise of Socialism, Germany's 
relation to the World War. Lectures and collateral reading. Text: 
Robinson and Beard, Development of Modern Europe, Volume II. 
Three times a week. (1920-'21.) 

3. Eastern Europe since 1815. The history of the Balkan 

41 



states from 1815 to the present and of Russia to the establishment of 
the Bolshevik regime. Lectures and collateral reading. Three times a 
week. (1921-72.) 

4. England and the British Empire since 1815. A study of 
England's domestic history and of British Imperialism, followed by a 
survey of the European problems taken up at the Peace Conference. 
Lectures and collateral reading. Three times a week. (1921 '22.) 

5. English History to 1689. The general political history of 
England will be studied with the use of such a text as Cheyney's Short 
History of England. Three times a week. (1920-'21.) 

6. English History since 1 689. A continuation of course 5. 
Special emphasis will be laid upon the development of English govern- 
mental institutions. Three times a week. (1920-'21.) 

Courses 5 and 6 should be taken by those preparing for the study 
of Law. 

7. American Constitutional History to 1 789. Special emphasis 
is directed to the origin and development of political institutions during 
the colonial period and to the formation of state and federal consti- 
tutions. A study is also made of the British system of Colonial ad- 
ministration. Lectures and readings. Text: Bolton, The Colonization 
of North America. Three times a week. (1921 -'22.) 

8. American Foreign Relations. The diplomatic relations of the 
United States, since 1 789, with the principal countries of Europe and 
with China and Japan. The origin and development of the Monroe 
Doctrine. Text: Fish, American Diplomacy. Three times a week. 
(1921-72.) 

PHILOSOPHY 

PROFESSOR JELLEMA 

1. Psychology. Open to Freshmen. Text: Pillsbury. Three 
times a week. 

2. Logic. Open to Freshmen. A course in traditional logic. 
Throughout an attempt is made to estimate its relation to real logic. 
Exercises. Text: Minto. Three times a week. 

3. Introduction to Philosophy. A course primarily in the method 
of philosophy. The relation of philosophy to common sense, science, 
etc. The problems of philosophy as life. Lectures and discussions. 
Supplementary text: Hibben. Three times a week. 

4. History of Ancient and Mediaeval Philosophy. An attempt 
by discussion to appreciate the problems and method of philosophy ay 

42 



incorporated in the historic development. Emphasis is on the implicit 
movement. Collateral reading including fragments from the translated 
sources. Text: Cushman, volume I. Three times a week. 

5. History of Modern Philosophy. Continuation of Course 4. 
Text: Cushman, volume II. Three times a week. 

6. Ethics. Lectures and discussions on the problems and method 
in Ethics with emphasis on the relation to metaphysics. Three times a 
week. 

7. Metaphysics. Especial attention is paid to the bearing of 
religion. Courses 1 to 5 or equivalent prerequisite. Lectures and dis- 
cussions. Three times a week. 

8. Kant, Hegel, and Modern Philosophy. An intensive study of 
this period, its setting, the problems solved and those raised. Especial 
attention in contemporary philosophy to the movement of thought in 
America. Lectures and discussions. Three times a week. 

Courses 6, 7 and 8 may be altered during 1921 -'22 to suit the 
needs of students. 

EDUCATION 

PROFESSOR J. BROENE 

1 . Principles of Education. A study of the aim of education 
and of the various underlying problems. Three times a week. 

2. The Practice of Education. This course deals with the teach- 
ing process and with problems pertaining to class management. Three 
times a week. 

3. History of Education. A survey of the growth of educational 
theory and practice during the ancient and mediaeval periods. Three 
times a week. 

4. History of Education. A continuation of Course 1 covering 
the modern period. Three times a week. 

5. School Administration. This course aims to discuss the 
organization and management of state and local school systems. Two 
times a week. 

6. Principles of Secondary Education. A study of secondary 
school problems. Special attention is given to the phenomena and prob- 
lems of adolescence. Two times a week. 

43 



Other courses in education are planned but can not as yet be an- 
nounced. 

Courses in the methods of teaching high school subjects will be 
offered by the various departments. 

MATHEMATICS 

PROFESSOR RINCK 

1 . Algebra. For those who have had only one unit of algebra in 
the Preparatory School. Three hours a week. 

2. Solid Geometry. For those who have had only one unit of 
geometry in the Preparatory School. 

3. College Algebra. Quadratic equations reviewed, graphical 
representation, mathematical induction, binomial theorem, progression, 
permutations and combinations, complex numbers, elements of theory 
of equations, determinants, logarithms. Text: Rietz and Crathorne's 
College Algebra. Three hours a week. 

4. Plane Trigonometry. Text: Murray's Plane and Spherical 
Trigonometry with Tables. Three hours a week. 

5. Plane Analytic Geometry. Text: Ziwet and Hopkins, Analy- 
tic Geometry. Four hours a week. 

6. Continuation of Course 5. Plane Analytic Geometry and 
introduction to Solid Analytic Geometry. Four hours a week. 

7. Differential and Integral Calculus. Four hours a week. 

8. Continuation of Course 7. Integral Calculus and Introduction 
to Differential Equations. Four hours a week. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PROFESSOR HOEKSTRA 

1 . Introduction to Political Science. The origin, nature, and 
essential elements of the state. State forms and forms of government. 
Sovereignty and the relation of states to one another. Lectures and 
collateral reading. Text: Leacock, Elements of Political Science. 
Three times a week. ( 1 920-'2 1 .) 

2. Introduction to Political Science. A continuation of Course 1 . 
The sphere of the state. Theories of State functions. The constitution 
of the State. Distribution of the powers of government. Lectures and 
collateral reading. Text: Leacock. Three times a week. (1920-'21.) 

44 



3. American Constitutional Law. The constitutional framework 
and the practical operation of the Federal and State constitutions. The 
relation of government to the business and social interests of the people. 
Interpretation of the constitution by the various departments of the 
government. Text: Kimball, The National Government of the United 
States. Three times a week. (1 920-'21 and 1 921-72.) 

4. American Constitutional Law. Continuation of Course 3. 
Three times a week. (1920-71 and 1921-72.) 

SOCIOLOGY 

PROFESSOR RYSKAMP 

1 . Principles of Sociology. A study of the underlying principles 
of social science: the individual in society, the social mind, social 
organization, etc. Three times a week. 

2. Principles and Problems of Sociology. A continuation of 
Course 1 with a further application of these principles to present-day 
problems. Three times a week. 

4. Problems of Sociology. More intensive work in specific prob- 
lems of sociology. Special studies of the various institutions and the 
special problems, such as the race problem, the problem of poverty, 
community problems. This course to be given in cycles. Topics for 
1 92 1 -72 to be announced later. Three times a week. 

ECONOMICS 

PROFESSOR RYSKAMP 

1 . Elements of Political Economy I. Principles. A review of 
the fundamental principles underlying modern economic life. Three 
times a week. 

2. Elements of Political Economy II. A continuation of the 
principles of political economy and an application of the same to current 
industrial problems and institutions. Three times a week. 

3. Labor Problems. The historical background of the modern 
labor movement, the controversies between capital and labor, and the 
various solutions offered. Three times a week. 

ORGANIC SCIENCE 

PROFESSOR VAN HAITSMA 
1 . Fundamentals of Zoology. Three recitations and one labora- 
tory period a week. Laboratory fee $2.00. 

45 



2. Vertebrate Zoology. Comparative anatomy and natural his- 
tory of vertebrates. Three recitations and one laboratory period a week. 
Laboratory fee $2.00. 

3. Invertebrate Zoology. Anatomy, physiology, behavior and 
classification of typical invertebrate animals. Three recitations and one 
laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee $2.00. 

4. Introduction to Botany. Anatomy, physiology and classifica- 
tion of seed plants. Three recitations and one laboratory period a week. 
Laboratory fee $2.00. 

5. Plant Morphology. This course offers a general systematic 
view of the plant kingdom. Three recitations and one laboratory period 
a week. Laboratory fee $2.00. (Not offered in 1 92 1 -'22.) 

PHYSICS 

PROFESSOR OLTHOFF 

1 . General Physics. Mechanics, Sound and Heat. Pre- 
requisites: High School Physics and a course in Plane Trigonometry. 
Four times a week. 

2. General Physics. Continuation of Course I. Magnetism, 
Electricity and Light. Four times a week. 

3. Laboratory work in Mechanics, Sound, and Heat. One period 
a week. Laboratory fee $2.00. 

4. Laboratory work in Magnetism, Electricity, and Light. Con- 
tinuation of Course 3. One period a week. Laboratory fee $2.00. 

5. Problem Course. Required of all Engineering students. One 
hour a week. 

CHEMISTRY 

PROFESSOR NIEUWDORP 

1 . General and Inorganic Chemistry. Study of the fundamental 
principles and modern theories, and of some of the most important ele- 
ments and their compounds. Three recitations. One laboratory period 
of four hours and one hour discussion of laboratory work a week. Lab- 
oratory fee $2.50. Breakage fee $2.50. 

2. General and Inorganic Chemistry. Study of the occurrence, 
preparation, and properties of the elements and their most important 
compounds. Three recitations. One laboratory period of four hours 

46 



and one hour discussion of laboratory work a week. Laboratory fee 
$2.50. Breakage fee $2.50. 

3. Qualitative Analysis. Pre-requisite: Courses 1 and 2. Study 
of the reactions of the metallic elements. Discussion of the operations 
and methods used in the identification of unknown substances and mix- 
tures. Special attention will be paid to the principles relating to the 
ionization of substances in solution and to the laws of chemical equili- 
brium. Three recitations and from six to eight hours of laboratory work 
a week. Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage fee $2.50. 

4. Organic Chemistry. Pre-requisite: General Chemistry. Study 
of the preparation and properties of the chief aliphatic and aromatic 
compounds. Three recitations. Four hours laboratory work a week. 
Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage fee $2.50. 



47 



PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



COURSES OF STUDY 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



1 . The Seminary Preparatory Course is intended for those students 
who expect to take up theology. Under ordinary circumstances, stu- 
dents selecting this course are expected to take the prescribed studies. 

2. Students selecting the Teachers' Course must take the prescribed 
course. In exceptional cases, this course may be varied with the appro- 
val of the Committee on Studies. 

For the four hours which drop out during the second semester of the 
Fourth Year practice work is to be arranged as follows: Four weeks 
of observation, four weeks of teaching under guidance, and four weeks 
of teaching without direct supervision. 

3. Students who are candidates for graduation in other courses 
must complete sixteen units, a unit meaning a subject of study pursued 
through a school year, with five recitation periods a week. Of these 
sixteen units, ten must be presented by all applicants, viz. : 

English, 3 units. 
Mathematics, 2 units. 
Physics, 1 unit. 

Latin or a Modern Language, 2 units. 
Bible Study, 1 unit. 

History, 1 unit. (Either Ancient History, Medieval and Modern 
History, or American History and Civics.) 

The remaining six units may be selected from the following list: 

Latin, 1 unit. 

German, 2 units. 

French, 2 units. 

Dutch, 2 units. 

History, 2 units. 

Chemistry, 1 unit. 

51 



Algebra and Geometry, 1 unit. 
Trigonometry, Yl unit. 
General Science, 1 unit. 
Botany, Yl unit. 
Zoology, Yl unit. 
Physiology, Yl unit. 
Agriculture, Yl unit. 

a. Civics and American History form together one unit. If 
Civics, therefore, is selected and is to be counted for credit, American 
History must be taken to complete the unit. No credit toward gradu- 
ation will generally be given for a single unit of French, of German, or 
of Holland. 

b. Those who look forward to an engineering course are advised 
to take three units of mathematics and one and a half or two units of 
the following: Chemistry, one unit; Plane Trigonometry, one-half unit; 
French or German, one or two units; Greek or Latin, one or two units. 

c. Those who upon graduation expect to take a course in medicine 
must take French or German and Biology in the third year, and Ger- 
man or French and Chemistry in the fourth year. Moreover, one unit 
of General History and one unit of American History and Civics are 
required. 

d. Without the consent of the Committee on Studies, no student 
is allowed to take more than the number of hours specified in the course 
of study. 

e. Those who expect to take Trigonometry should elect mathe- 
matics in the third year. 



52 







Schedule of Studies 




Seminary 


Classical 


Modern 


Teachers' 


c3 


Preparatory- 


Classical 


Course 


English 5| 




© Latin 5 

^ i Algebra 5 

to 'General Science 5 




The first two years of 


& Bible 1 




fc 




these Courses are 


Fh 




Not Offered at Calvin during 


© English 5 




** 1 Latin 5 


1920-'21 


73 Ancient History 5 




fl Geometry 5 
§ Bible 1 

03 










English 5 


English 5 






English 5 


(1st Semester) 


(1st Semester) 


English 3 
Botany 3 


Fh 


(1st Semester) 


Latin 5 


Botany - Agricul- 


G8 


Latin 5 

(2nd Semester) 


(2nd Semester) 
Physiology and 


ture 5 (2nd Sem.) 
Physiology and 


Physiology 3 
Agriculture 4 




Physiology and 


Zoology 5 


Zoology 5 or 


Arithmetic 3 


Fh 


Zoology 5 


Modern History 5 


Chemistry 5 


English Review 2 


13 


Modern History 5 
Dutch 5 


or Mathematics 5 
Dutch 5 or 


Modern History 
or Mathematics 5 


Bib. Archaeology 1 
Bible 2 




Bible 1 


German 5 


German 5 




— 




Bible 1 


Bible 1 






Latin 5 


Botany-Agricul- 






Latin 5 (1st Sem.) 


(1st Semester) 


ture 5 (1st Sem.) 




03 


English 5 


English 5 


English 5 


English 4 (1st Sem.) 


© 


(2nd Semester) 


(2nd Semester) 


(2nd Semester) 


English Review 2 


Dutch 5 


Dutch or 


German 5 


Pedagogy 3 


■g 


Am. History and 


German 5 


Am. History and 


Geography 4 


"£ 


Civics 5 


Am. History and 


Civics 5 


Physics 5 


g Physics 5 


Civics 5 


Physics 5 


Bible 2 


& 


Bible 1 


Physics 5 
Bible 1 


Bible 1 





"fThe figures denote the number of recitations per week. 



53 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



The figure at the right of the name of the course indicates the year 
of the curriculum. 

BIBLE STUDY 

PROFESSORS HEYNS, BERKHOF, AND STOB 
Bible Study 1 . Old Testament History until the time of Solomon's 
reign. Text: McLear, Heyns. Once a week. Professor Heyns. 

Bible Study 2. First semester: remainder of Old Testament His- 
tory. Second semester: New Testament History until the third year 
of the Lord's Public Ministry. Texts: McLear, Heyns. Once a week. 
Professor Heyns. 

Bible Study 3 A. Remainder of New Testament History. Texts: 
McLear, Heyns. For Seminary Preparatory students. Once a week. 
Professor Heyns. 

Bible Study 3B. Biblical Doctrines. For students in Teacher's 
Course. Twice a week. Archaeology 3 should supplement. Pro- 
fessor Stob. 

Bible Study 3C. A careful study of the Life of Christ is made. 
Text: Vollmer. For students in courses other than those of 3B and 
3C. Once a week. Professor Stob. 

Archaeology 3. Biblical Archaeology. Once a week. Professor 
Berkhof. 

Bible Study 4A. Reformed Doctrine: Introduction; the Doctrine 
of God; the Doctrine of Man. Text: Heyns. For Seminary Pre- 
paratory students. Once a week. Professor Heyns. 

Bible Study 4B. Reformed Doctrine. Two hours. For students 
of Teachers' Course. Professor Stob. 

Bible Study 4C. Reformed Doctrine: Introduction; Doctrine of 
God; Doctrine of Man. Term papers assigned. Text: Bosma. Once 
a week. Professor Stob. 

54 



LATIN 

PROFESSOR ROOKS AND ASSISTANT PROFESSOR STOB 
Latin 1 . The declensions and the common forms of the four con- 
jugations. The elements of syntax. The acquiring of a good working 
vocabulary. Reading Latin aloud. Daily exercises in the writing of 
Latin. Text: Place, Beginning Latin. Five times a week. Assistant 
Professor Stob. 

Latin 2. The equivalent of four books of Caesar's Gallic Wars 
is read. Emphasis is laid on syntax, in particular on that of the verb. 
Such topics as the significance of the wars, the campaigns, and the 
character of Caesar are studied on the basis of the text. Sight reading. 
Latin composition. Texts: Kelsey's Caesar's Commentaries. Five 
times a week. Professor Rooks and Assistant Professor Stob. 

Latin 3. Three orations against Catiline. Special attention given 
to the syntax of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives. Prose composition. 
Five times a week. Second semester. Texts: Kelsey's Cicero; Ben 
nett's Latin Grammar. Professor Rooks. 

Latin 4. The four orations against Catiline; De Imperio Pompeii; 
selected letters. Drill in the forms and syntax of the verb continued. 
Special attention given to the syntax of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives. 
Prose composition. Five times a week. Texts: Kelsey's Cicero; 
Bennett's Latin Grammar. Professor Rooks. 

DUTCH 

PROFESSOR VAN ANDEL 
Dutch 3. Elementary Course. Grammar and Composition. Read- 
ing of modern texts. During the Second semester outside reading is 
required. Texts: Van Andel, Holland Grammar; Ulfers, Oostloorn, 
or equivalent. Five times a week. ( 1 92 1 -'22.) 

Dutch 4A. Intermediate Course. Review of Grammar: Reading 
of nineteenth century prose and poetry. Literature: Hildebrand, Camera 
Obscura; Potgieter, Proza; De Genestet, Gedichten. Composition. 
Required outside reading of 300 pages a month. As far as possible the 
work in the class room is carried on in Dutch. Five times a week. 
First semester. (1922-'23.) 

Dutch 4B. Advanced Course. Dutch Romanticism and Realism. 
Text: De Voogd, Historische Schets van de Nederlandsche Letter- 

55 



kunde; Leopold and Pik, Nederlandsche Letterkunde. Special study 
is made of Bilderdyk and Da Costa as poets, philosophers, and origi- 
nators of the revival of Calvinism in Holland. Text: Bavinck, Bilder- 
dyk als Denker en Dichter. Assigned reading and essays. Five times 
a week. Second semester. (1922-'23.) 

ENGLISH 

PROFESSOR VANDEN BOSCH 

English 1 . Kittredge and Farley's Advanced English Grammar. 
Scott's Ivanhoe and Lady of the Lake and Irving's Sketch Book. Five 
times a week. 

English 2. Rhetoric. Text: Thomas, Howe, and O'Hair, Com- 
position and Rhetoric. Literature. George Eliot's Silas Marner, 
Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Carlyle's Essay on Burns, Lowell's Vision 
of Sir Launfal, Irving's Sketch Book, or equivalents. Five times a week. 

English 3. Painter's Elementary Guide to Literary Criticism. 
Literature: Milton's Minor Poems and Macaulay's Essay on Milton. 
Five times a week. First semester. 

English 4. History of English Literature. Special study of 
Shakespeare's As You Like It and Macbeth, and a more rapid survey 
of as many masterpieces as can be taken up. 

Teachers' Course 3 and 4. A study is made of methods of teach- 
ing spelling, language, and reading in the grades. During 1921 -'22 
English grammar will be reviewed. Twice a week. 

FRENCH 

PROFESSOR A. E. BROENE 

French 3. Elementary Course. Essentials of grammar. Reading 
of simple prose. Composition. Five times a week. 

French 4. Intermediate Course. Grammar continued. Reading 
of Nineteenth Century prose. Composition. Four times a week. 

GERMAN 

PROFESSOR A. E. BROENE 
German 3. Elementary Course. Essentials of grammar. Oral 
and written work. Reading of about 150 pages of modern prose. Five 
times a week. 

German 4. Intermediate course including reading, composition, 
and review of grammar. The reading includes modern prose fiction 
and drama. Outside reading with reports. Five times a week. 

56 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

PROFESSOR STOB 
Public Speaking 3. Introducing Course. Text: Fulton and True- 
blood: Essentials of Public Speaking. Once a week. 

MUSIC 

MR. VEATCH 
Courses in Music in the College are open to students in the Pre- 
paratory School. 

HISTORY 

PROFESSOR HOEKSTRA 

General History 2. Ancient History, with special reference to 
Greece and Rome, but preceded by a short introductory study of the 
more ancient nations, and closing with the establishment of the Holy 
Roman Empire. Text: West's Ancient World. Five times a week. 

General History 3. A survey of Mediaeval and Modern European 
History from 800 A. D. to the present. Text: West's Modern World. 
Five times a week. 

American History 4. The study of American History has for its 
object to familiarize the student with the important facts and events 
of the history of our country, and to equip him with a clear outline of 
American History as a foundation for more advanced work or more 
intelligent reading. Text: Fite, History of the United States. Three 
times a week. 

Civics 4. A study is made of municipal, state, and national gov- 
ernment. Text: James and Sanford, Our Government. Twice a week. 

PEDAGOGY 

PROFESSOR J. BROENE 
Pedagogy 4. Principles and methods of teaching. An especial 
effort is made to train teachers for work in Christian Schools. Texts: 
Adams, A Primer in Teaching; Bagley, Classroom Management. 
Three times a week. 

MATHEMATICS 

PROFESSOR RINCK 
Mathematics 1 . The whole year is devoted to Algebra. The 
subject is at all stages vitally connected with the arithmetic with which 

57 



the student is already familiar. The inductive method of presentation is 
used throughout. Attention is given to the practical side of the sub- 
ject. Text: Slaught and Lennes, First Principles of Algebra, Ele- 
mentary Course. Five times a week. Three sections. 

Mathematics 2. Plane Geometry. The logic of the subject is 
emphasized. Accuracy in definitions and other statements is constantly 
sought. Through the solution of a large number of exercises an at- 
tempt is made to develop the originality of the student. Applications 
of the subject are noted. Text: Ford and Ammerman, Plane Geome- 
try. Five times a week. Two sections. 

Mathematics 3A. Algebra. A more intensive and rigorous study 
of the subject than could be undertaken in the first year. Five times 
a week during the first semester. Text: Hawkes-Luby-Touton, Second 
Course in Algebra. 

Mathematics 3B. Solid Geometry. Continuation of Mathematics 
2. Five times a week during the second semester. Text: Ford and 
Ammerman, Solid Geometry. 

Arithmetic 4. This course is adapted to those who expect to 
teach. Fundamental notions are thoroughly reviewed; the logic of the 
subject is emphasized; methods of teaching are indicated; some atten- 
tion is paid to the historical development of the subject. Three times 
a week. Texts: Lyman, Advanced Arithmetic; Stone, The Teaching 
of Arithmetic. 

ORGANIC SCIENCE 

PROFESSOR VAN HAITSMA 

General Science 1. An introduction to the study of nature. Text: 
Caldwell and Eikenberry's General Science. Four recitations and one 
laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee $2.00 

Botany 3. This course attempts to give an insight into the nature 
of plants. The relation of plants to man is emphasized. Regular field 
trips are made in the fall as long as the weather permits. Texts: Bergen 
and Caldwell's Introduction to Botany, North Central States Edition; 
Van Haitsma's Laboratory Guides in Practical Biology. Five recita- 
tions and a two-hour laboratory period a week during one semester. 
Laboratory fee $1.00. 

Zoology 3. An introduction to Zoology from the general culture 
point of view. Two recitations and one laboratory period a week. 
Laboratory fee $2.00 

58 



Physiology 3. The subject deals with the anatomy, physiology, 
and hygiene of the human body. Thruout the course the student's at- 
tention is called to the Christian principles underlying the study of the 
subject. The course is designed especially for prospective teachers. 
Text: Eddy's Text-book in General Physiology and Anatomy. Twice 
a week. Prof. J. Broene. 

Agriculture 3 and 4. This course in applied science is given pri- 
marily for prospective teachers. Text: Warren's Elements of Agri- 
culture. Four recitations and one laboratory period a week during the 
year. Laboratory fee $2.00. (1920-'21.) Alternates with geography. 

Geography 4. Fundamentals of physical and mathematical geo- 
graphy for teachers. Four recitations and one laboratory period a week. 
Laboratory fee $2.00. 

PHYSICS 
PROFESSOR OLTHOFF 

Physics 4. This course deals with the fundamental principles of 
Mechanics, Heat, Electricity, Sound, and Light. Texts: Millikan and 
Gale's Practical Physics; Millikan-Gale-Bishop's Laboratory Physics. 
Four recitations and one laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee 
$2.00. 

CHEMISTRY 

PROFESSOR NIEUWDORP 

Chemistry 4. In this course a study is made of the most important 
elements and their principal compounds. Some of the fundamental laws 
and theories of chemistry are discussed. Texts: First Principles of 
Chemistry by Brownlee and Laboratory Exercises by the same author. 
Four recitations and three hours of laboratory work a week. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The University of Michigan requires gymnasium work twice a week 
of first year students and recommends that the students of the other years 
take such work. Students of our school who take work in the College 
Department and who look forward towards taking advanced work at 
the University of Michigan can satisfy the requirements of physical 
training of Freshmen students at the U. of M. by taking the elementary 
course given at our city Y. M. C. A. 

59 



The following courses in Physical Training are offered at our 
Y. M. C. A., which our students may take: 

First year work. (Elementary). Light calisthenics, marching, 
heavy calisthenics, group games and contests, apparatus work. Other 
exercises for the improvement, posture, breathing, and muscular coordi- 
nation. Two hours credit. 

Second year work. (Advanced). Advanced calisthenics, dumb- 
bells, wands, marching, heavy apparatus, group games, and contests of 
a developed mental type. Two hours credit. 



60 



Roll of Students and Alumni 



STUDENTS 



THE SEMINARY 



THIRD YEAR 



Name City Address Residence 

John Breuker 241 Warren Avenue Holland 

John De Haan 754 Sherman Street Grand Rapids 

John S. Dykstra 918 Kalamazoo Avenue Holland 

Benjamin Essenburg 708 Dykema Court Grand Rapids 

Peter Carl James Goeree 636 Eastern Avenue . . . . Wagenborgen, Neth. 

William Goudberg 928 Thomas Street Grand Rapids 

Corneal Holtrop 636 Eastern Avenue Ferrysburg 

Elbert Kooistra 1025 Sherman Street Grand Rapids 

Edward Joling 1021 Alpine Avenue Grand Rapids 

John Medendorp 1 160 Oliver Avenue Grand Rapids 

George Martin Ophoff 725 Henry Avenue Grand Rapids 

Edward Bernard Pekelder 1041 Cass Avenue Grand Rapids 

Benjamin H. Spalink. . . 1353 Kalamazoo Avenue Grand Rapids 

Charles Spoelhof 836 Prince Street Paterson, N. J. 

Harm Vander Woude 728 Logan Street Grand Rapids 

Jacob Raymond Van Dyke 1 146 Marshall Avenue Holland 

Emo Folkert Johann Van Halsema 1213 Butler Avenue Grand Rapids 

Frederick H. Wezeman 1209 Dunham Street Oak Park, 111. 

SECOND YEAR 

Edward Boeve 1025 Wealthy Street Holland 

Jacob Harry Bruinooge 636 Eastern Avenue Sheboygan, Wis. 

Otto Benjamin De Jong 636 Eastern Avenue Hull, Iowa 

Johann Ralph Euwema 946 Sherman Street Oak Park, 111. 

Nicholas John Monsma 1029 Baxter Street Grand Rapids 

Edward Van Farowe 951 Milliard Street Grand Rapids 

Herman Van Lunen 90S Temple Street Grand Rapids 

Cornelius Van Reenen 911 Temple Street Grand Rapids 

John Zeeuw 130 Mayfield Avenue Paterson, N. J. 

FIRST YEAR 

Garret Andre 441 Henry Avenue Paterson, N. J. 

Isaac Couwenhoven 701 Logan Street So. Holland, III. 

Paul De Koekkoek 522 Henry Avenue Edgerton, Minn. 

Herman Harry Dykhouse 634 Charles Street Kalamazoo 

Peter G. Dykhuizen 701 Logan Street Lafayette, Ind. 

Enno Ralph Haan 725 Henry Avenue Orange City, la. 

Garret Hofmeyer 546 Dolbee Avenue Grand Rapids 

Elton John Holtrop 636 Eastern Avenue Ferrysburg 

Jacob Henry Joldersma 724 Henry Avenue Willard, Ohio 

John Leonard Koert 1234 Kalamazoo Avenue Lynden, Wash. 

Herman Koning 1003 Logan Street Grand Rapids 

Cornelius J. Scholten 914 Thomas Street Comstock 

Albert H. Smit 923 Worden Street Grand Rapids 

Paul Van Dyken 636 Eastern Avenue Manhattan, Mont. 

Lambertus Van Laar 911 Temple Street Rock Valley, la. 

Gerben Zylstra 1059 Bates Street Sully, la. 

SPECIAL 

Ralph Bronkema 1019 Widdicomb Avenue Grand Rapids 

63 



THE COLLEGE 



SENIOR CLASS 
Name College Address Residence 

Carl Edwin Burklund 677 Stocking Avenue Grand Rapids 

Clarence Thomas De Graaf 776 Leonard Street Grand Rapids 

William Albert De Jonge 805 Grandville Avenue Grand Rapids 

Matthys Hendrikus De Vroome.. 817 Alexander Street Grand Rapids 

Garritt Kempers 940 Dunham Street Hull, Iowa 

John Kuiper 1009 Bates Street Grand Rapids 

Garritt E. Roelofs 616 Dolbee Avenue Raymond, Minn. 

William Gerard Rozeboom 616 Dolbee Avenue Sioux Center, la. 

Martin Seven 927 Eleventh Street Grand Rapids 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Margaret Euphemia Bell 936 Oakhi'U Street Sparkill, N. Y. 

Peter Gerrit Berkhout 1226 Leonard Street Grand Rapids 

David Douwe Bonnema 718 Dykema Court Hawarden, la. 

Benjamin John Danhof 723 Dykema Court Grand Rapids 

John Jacob De Waard 1045 Thomas Street So. Holland, III. 

Aldrich Dusseljee 1060 Logan Street Grand Rapids 

John Martin Dykstra 939 Hall Street Chicago, 111. 

Richard J. Frens 825 Humboldt Street Fremont 

John Gritter R. R. No. 6 Grand Rapids 

Fred Haan 624 Union Avenue Grand Rapids 

Raymond Hoekstra 649 Franklin Street Midland Park, N. J. 

Oren Holtrop 636 Eastern Avenue Ferrysburg 

Melvin Rudolph Houseman 1010 Eastern Avenue Grand Rapids 

Richard Jacob Karsen 701 Logan Street Chicago, 111. 

William Kok, Jr 1046 Wealthy Street Grand Rapids 

Jacob George Kooistra 839 Oakhill Street Grand Rapids 

Gertrude Marie Lucas Jenison 

Martin Monsma 1 100 Thomas Street Grand Rapids 

John Renze Rozendal 636 Eastern Avenue Chicago, 111. 

Seymour Swets 1 1 50 Alexander Street Grand Rapids 

Christian Henry Telman 1 106 Grandville Avenue Grand Rapids 

Henry T. Vander Ark 911 Thomas Street Manhattan, Mont. 

Gerrit T. Vander Lugt 825 Humboldt Street Colton, So. Dak. 

Albert Van Dyken 825 Humboldt Street Manhattan, Mont. 

Cornelius Van Til 825 Humboldt Street Hammond, Ind. 

John Arthur Visser 754 Sherman Street Pella, Iowa 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

William Alkema 1242 Leonard Street Grand Rapids 

John Beebe 836 Prince Street West Sayville, N. Y. 

Stuart Bergsma 447 Fuller Avenue Grand Rapids 

John Ralph Bos 621 Delaware Street Grand Rapids 

Ralph J. Bos 1171 Oliver Avenue Grand Rapids 

Angelyn Helen Bouwsma 1026 Sigsbee Street Muskegon 

Herman John Brink 550 Eastern Avenue Rehoboth, N. M. 

64 



Name College Address Residence 

Fred Bronkema 1118 Turner Avenue Grand Rapids 

John Peter Brouwer 1060 Logan Street Hull, Iowa 

Ralph John Danhof 950 Dunham Street Grand Rapids 

John James De Boer 1209 Dunham Street Chicago, 111. 

Anna Frances De Mol R. F. D. No. 10 Grand Rapids 

Cornelius August Faber 347 Donald Place Hull, Iowa 

David Grasman 728 Logan Street Grand Rapids 

John Hofstra 869 Eleventh Street Grand Rapids 

John Holwerda 1 1 00 Baxter Street Paterson, N.J. 

Christian Huissen 636 Bates Street Kenosha, Wis. 

Albert Jabaay 819 Logan Street Hammond, Ind. 

Anthony Albert Koning 1060 Logan Street Kalamazoo 

Martin Pothoven 1059 Bates Street Pella, Iowa 

James Putt 1 146 Widdicomb Avenue Grand Rapids 

Henry Rikkers 912 Franklin Street Hull, Iowa 

John Rubingh Thomas Street Ellsworth 

William Henry Rutgers 706 Franklin Street Lynden, Wash. 

Cornelius Matthew Schoolland. . . 854 Worden Street Grand Rapids 

Albert Hendrikus Selles 819 Logan Street Grand Rapids 

Cornelius Smith 1036 Hermitage Street . . . .Prairie View, Kans. 

Henry A. Swets 1 1 50 Alexander Street Grand Rapids 

Henry John Triezenberg 1 133 Logan Street Kalamazoo 

Martin Van Dyk 911 Thomas Street Ogilvie, Minn. 

John James Van Heest 859 Oakhill Street Grand Rapids 

Daniel Van Houte 823 Baxter Street Grand Rapids 

Andrew Van Solkema 920 Sherman Street Ross 

Bernardus Van Someren 905 Dunham Street Baldwin, Wis. 

Dewey Westra 819 Logan Street Randolph, Wis. 

Garrett Wyngarden R. R. 7 Grand Rapids 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Harry Abma 920 Sherman Street Rock Valley, Iowa 

Ary John Abrahams 827 Dunham Street Grand Rapids 

William Clarence Beets 737 Madison Avenue Grand Rapids 

Jennie Boersma 854 Alexander Street Grand Rapids 

Menso Bolt 944 Caulfield Avenue Grand Rapids 

Nelly Jeanette Bosma 831 Bates Street Grand Rapids 

Louis Bouma 653 Franklin Street Hull, Iowa 

William Peter Brouwer 1060 Logan Street Hull, Iowa 

Cecil De Boer 820 Henry Avenue Grand Rapids 

Nicholas De Vries 653 Franklin Street Paterson, N. J 

John Henry Geurkink 706 Franklin Street Pease, Minn 

Samuel James Greydanus 636 Eastern Avenue Conrad, Mont 

John Samuel Haitema 706 Franklin Street Worthington, Minn 

Minnie Mae Hoek 936 Oakhill Street West Sayville, N. J 

Peter Hoekstra 650 Pleasant Street Grand Rapids 

William Holwerda Laraway Avenue Grand Rapids 

Alfred Claud Kinkema 805 Grandville Avenue Grand Haven 

Hessel Kooistra 1036 Evergreen Street Coopersville 

John Cornelius Kruithof 526 B Street Grand Rapids 

John Orlebeke 653 Franklin Street Rochester, N. Y. 

Marie Frances Peters 1207 Sigsbee Street Grand Rapids 

Andrew Sail 356 Calkins Avenue Grand Rapids 

John L. Schaver 653 Franklin Street Ellsworth 

Edward Schoo 1 140 Oliver Avenue Falmouth 

Peter Lambert Steen 724 Henry Avenue Paterson, N. J. 

65 



Name College Address Residence 

Albert Kunnen Stevens 636 Eastern Avenue Fremont 

Henry Tunis Swets 1015 Dallas Avenue Grand Rapids 

John Swets 1 1 50 Alexander Street Grand Rapids 

Caroline Louise Temple 1044 Bates Street Grand Rapids 

Elizabeth Ten Hoor 918 Union Avenue Grand Rapids 

George Ten Hoor 1461 North Avenue Holland 

Johanna Timmer 865 Ninth Street Holland 

Cornell Van Beek 1337 Alexander Street Borculo 

Henry Vande Kieft 347 Donald Place Pella, Iowa 

Carolyn Mae Vander Meer 1311 Turner Avenue Grand Rapids 

Marvin John Vander Werp 655 Dolbee Avenue Zeeland 

Jacob Van Zylveld R. R. 6 Grand Rapids 

Herman Wierenga 914 Tamarack Avenue Grand Rapids 

John Yelhs 34 Sutton Street Grand Rapids 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Richard De Mol R. F. D. 10 Grand Rapids 

John William Christian Ehlers.. 923 Logan Street Kalamazoo 

Julia Gardella 308 Jefferson Avenue Grand Rapids 

Otto Hamstra 636 Eastern Avenue Bejou, Minn. 

Marinus Huiskamp 650 Thomas Street Wallington, N. J. 

Arnold William Hulst 1049 Bates Street Grand Rapids 

Bessie Marie Newton 528 Franklin Street Grand Rapids 

Goldie E. Slater R. F. D. 10 Grand Rapids 

Cornelius Smith 1036 Hermitage Street . . . .Prairie View, Kans. 

Anna Barbara Van Dommelen . . . 711 So. Union Avenue Grand Rapids 

Henry John Van Laar 939 Hall Street Rock Valley, Iowa 

Henry Richard Wezeman 636 Eastern Avenue Nunica 



66 



PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



FOURTH YEAR 

Name College Address Residence 

Grace Altrude Berkhof 834 Worden Street Grand Rapids 

Joe Henry Betten 636 Eastern Avenue Fremont 

Anna Bolthouse 877 Grandville Avenue Grand Rapids 

Daniel Frederick Bosma 831 Bates Street Grand Rapids 

Ralph Jacob Brink 862 Thomas Street Grand Rapids 

William Buiten 707 Union Avenue Grand Rapids 

Frank De Jong 636 Eastern Avenue Hull, Iowa 

Reina Gessiena De Jonge 805 Grandville Avenue Grand Rapids 

Daniel De Vries 948 Logan Street Grand Rapids 

Gertrude Elsie De Vries 1026 Sigsbee Street Grand Rapids 

Emmense John Dykstra 851 North Street Grand Rapids 

Annette Gertrude Feenstra R. F. D. No. 6 Grand Rapids 

Anna Groen 114 Major Place ; . . .Grand Rapids 

Theodore Thomas Helmus 937 Wealthy Street Grand Rapids 

Seibert James Heyboer 1110 McReynolds Avenue Grand Rapids 

John Otto Huizinga 709 Logan Street Grand Rapids 

Emma Sarah Imanse 51 Fitzhugh Avenue Grand Rapids 

Richard Jansma 1 308 Davis Avenue Grand Rapids 

John William Kingma 1 166 Hall Street Grand Rapids 

Jacob Kooyers 1200 Sherman Street Muskegon 

^rena Korfker 1201 Butler Avenue Grand Rapids 

Arthur Kort 636 Eastern Avenue Oak Lawn, III. 

Everett Kuizema 960 Temple Street Grand Rapids 

Gerlof Monsma . 1 100 Thomas Street Grand Rapids 

Rosa Oosterhouse R. R. No. 10 Grand Rapids 

Arthur John Peters '207 Sigsbee Street Grand Rapids 

John Rikkers 912 Franklin Street Hull, Iowa 

Henrietta Schreur 723 Dykema Court Dorr 

Ida Schuiling 810 Union Avenue Redlands, Cal. 

Sebastian Struyk 936 Oakhill Street Grand Rapids 

Franklin Henry Top 909 Dunham Street Grand Rapids 

Hilda Van Dam 932 Virginia Street Grand Rapids 

Jeanette Van den Berge 1 102 Fulton Street Grand Rapids 

John Dick Vander Ark 911 Thomas Street Manhattan, Mont. 

Herman Vander Griend 636 Eastern Avenue Harrison, So. Dak. 

Fannie Vander Mey 847 Sigsbee Street Grand Rapidts 

John Van Dyk 911 Thomas Street Inwood, Iowa 

Wilfred Westmaas 972 Pine Avenue Grand Rapids 

THIRD YEAR 

Nettie Abrahams 827 Dunham Street Grand Rapids 

Gerrit Beckering 522 Henry Avenue Edgerton, Minn. 

Marvin Lawrence Beinema 724 Henry Avenue Whitinsville, Mass. 

Abram Clasinus Boerkoel 229 Eastern Avenue Grand Rapids 

Frederick Boersma 854 Alexander Street Grand Rapids 

Elizabeth Bolt 1029 Helen Street Grand Rapids 

Sophy Bolt '029 Helen Street Grand Rapids 

67 



Name College Address Residence 

George Bosch 636 Eastern Avenue New Era 

Johanna Hildegarde Brink 862 Thomas Street Grand Rapids 

Chester William Broersma 844 Bates Street Grand Rapids 

Kathryn Louise De Kraker 959 Kalamazoo Avenue Grand Rapids 

Jacob John De Waard 1045 Thomas Street So. Holland, 111. 

Anna Goudberg 1 139 Sigsbee Street Grand Rapids 

Henrietta Jeanette Heyns 1319 Sigsbee Street Grand Rapids 

Sylvia Vera Highstone 1 139 Marshall Avenue Grand Rapids 

Nicholas Herman Hoitsma 611 Franklin Street Paterson, N. J. 

Henry F. Holtrop 636 Eastern Avenue Ferrysbura 

Peter Holwerda R. R. 10 Grand Rapids 

Jacob Tunis Hoogstra 1021 Sherman Street Paterson, N. J. 

Harry Kok 613 Eastern Avenue Grand Rapids 

Fanny Koning 1 1 33 Logan Street Grand Rapids 

Henry Peter Kooistra 1031 Wealthy Street Grand Rapids 

Charles Koppers 1131 Sherman Street Grand Rapids 

John Frederick Kuiper 747 Eastern Avenue Grand Rapids 

Catherine Michmershuizen 611 Bates Street Grand Rapids 

George Peter Miersma 607 Eastern Avenue Detroit 

Clifford Alexander Noordewier . . 520 Highland Street Grand Rapids 

Charles Pastoor 812 Sherman Street Grand Rapids 

Adam Persenaire 634 Charles Avenue Chicago, 111. 

Joe Peters 1207 Sigsbee Street Grand Rapids 

Theodore James Peters 1207 Sigsbee Street Grand Rapids 

Anna Petter 925 Watkins Street Central Lake 

Johannes Dirk Plekker 502 Worden Street Grand Rapids 

Clara Gertrude Rooks 710 Thomas Street Grand Rapids 

Jesse Schaaf 1 1 34 Worden Street Falmouth 

Conrad Spoelstra 619 Shamrock Street Grand Rapids 

Hila Theodora Vanden Bosch... 857 Bates Street Grand Rapids 

Herman Vander Mey 847 Sigsbee Street Grand Rapids 

William Vander Mey 847 Sigsbee Street Grand Rapids 

Ada Loretta Vander Vennen . . . . 928 Virginia Street Grand Rapids 

Claude Van Dyke 227 Ann Street Hudsonville 

Conrad Rhinehardt Veenstra.... 636 Eastern Avenue Muskegon 

Willemina Verspoor 834 Sherman Street Grand Rapids 

John William Vos 1116 Caulfield Avenue Grand Rapids 

John Weidenaar 636 Eastern Avenue Chicago, III. 

Evangeline Ruth Westenberg. . . . 446 Franklin Street Jenison 

Henrietta Wierenga 605 Woodworth Street Zeeland 

Anton John Winsemius 722 Paris Avenue Grand Rapids 

Marguerite Rosalia Wolma 49 Prospect Street Hudsonville 

SECOND YEAR 

Jacob Boerman 636 Eastern Avenue Zeeland 

Peter Djopaih Brink 1034 Sherman Street Toadlena, N. Mex. 

John Cammenga 853 Fountain Street Grand Rapids 

Charles Doezema R. R. No. 3 Grand Rapids 

Thomas Fongers 636 Eastern Avenue Zeeland 

Simon Grasman 728 Logan Street Grand Rapids 

John Griffioen 636 Eastern Avenue Grand Rapids 

Enno Ralph Haan 1310 Grandville Avenue Sully Iowa 

Stephen Hollander 937 Leonard Street Grand Rapids 

John Andrew Janssen 1242 Logan Street Grand Rapids 

John Daniel Koning 952 Sherman Street Grand Rapids 

Bert Kruithof 526 B Street Grand Rapids 

Emmett Cornelius Ludwig 115 Canton Street Grand Rapids 

68 



Name College Address Residence 

William John Monsma 1 100 Thomas Street Grand Rapids 

Fred Nyenhuis I 1 34 Worden Street Pease, Minn. 

Louis Regnerus 1036 Hermitage Street Detroit 

Hiram Vander Klay 1221 Kalamazoo Avenue Grand Rapids 

John Vander Ploeg . 1330 Grandville Avenue Grand Rapids 

Jacob H. Vander Veen 636 Eastern Avenue New Era 

Otto Vander Woude 636 Eastern Avenue Grand Rapids 

Cornelius J. Van Zytveld R. R. 6 Grand Rapids 

Martin Wallace Waalkes 620 Liberty Street Grand Rapids 

FIRST YEAR 

Richard Bolt 944 Caulfield Avenue Grand Rapids 

Lawrence J. De Koekkoek 522 Henry Avenue Edgerton, Minn. 

Ben De Young 734 Thomas Street Marion 

Arie Disselkoen 908 Temple Street Harrison, S. Dak. 

Albert Doom Byron Center 

John James Kenbeek 1036 Hermitage Street Detroit 

Albert S. Kiel 1 134 Worden Street Pease, Minn 

Nick Kort 636 Eastern Avenue Jenison 

Dick Mellema 1021 Sherman Street Marion, N. Y. 

Peter Monsma 1 100 Thomas Street Grand Rapids 

John Mulder 722 Minnie Street Grand Rapids 

Egbert Peter Nyenhuis 954 Bates Street Pease, Minn. 

Joe Schreur 723 Dykema Court Dorr 

Frank Vanden Bout 815 Eastern Avenue Rochester, N. Y. 

William Vander Lugt 912 Franklin Street Colton, S. Dak. 

Ira Vander Stou 815 Eastern Avenue Rochester, N. Y. 

William Wielsma Jenison 

Harry Wierenga 35 Lafayette Avenue Grand Rapids 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Bastian De Koekkoek 522 Henry Avenue Edgerton, Minn. 

Viola Mae Olney 1305 Sherman Street Grand Rapids 

Julius Vroon 1023 Dunham Street Grand Rapids 

David Wondergem 636 Eastern Avenue Sheyboygan, Wis. 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 

Seminary 44 

College 122 

Preparatory School 131 

Total 297 



69 



ALUMNI OF THE SEMINARY 



1877 

G. Broene Deceased 

G. Hoeksema Deceased 

1879 

C. Bode Deceased 

T. Vanden Bosch Deceased 



1880 

H. Douwstra Clergyman (Emeritus) Pella, la. 

1881 

H. Bode Deceased 

P. Schut Clergyman (Emeritus) Holland 

H. Tempel Deceased 

1882 

J. Post Clergyman CutlerVille 

1883 

E. Broene Deceased 

R. Drukker Deceased 

P. Ekster Deceased 

G. Vos Professor Princeton, N. J. 

1884 

J. Guelker Clergyman Ranville, Minn. 

P. Kosten Clergyman (Emeritus) Zeeland 

J. Riemersma Teacher Sioux Center, la. 

J. Vander Werp Clergyman Grand Haven 

F. Wilandt . Clergyman Lodi, N. J. 

1885 
W. Heyns Professor Grand Rapids 

1886 

G. D. De Jong Clergyman Highland, Ind. 

H. Huizingh Deceased 

A. Keizer Clergyman Harderwyk 

M. J. Marcusse Deceased 

O. Stuit Deceased 

1887 

J. B. Hoekstra Clergyman Midland Park, N. J. 

M. Van Vessem Clergyman Zeeland 

1888 

A. W. Meyer Clergyman (Emeritus) Pease, Minn. 

J. N. Trompen Clergyman Aurora, Col. 

E. Vanden Berge Clergyman Kilduff , la. 

P. Van Vliet Deceased 

71 



1889 

E. Breen Deceased 

J. Manni Clergyman Sheboygan, Wis. 

1890 
J. De Vries Deceased 

A. J. Van den Heuvel Clergyman Twin Lakes 

J. Wyngaarden Clergyman Walker 

1891 

G. A. De Haan Deceased 

J. Groen Clergyman Los Angeles, Cal. 

1892 

Th. L. De Lange Clergyman Sandstone, Minn. 

S. Koster Clergyman Firth, Neb. 

1893 
P. Bakker Deceased 

B. H. Einink Clergyman Holland 

G. G. Haan Clergyman Pella, la. 

H. Walkotten Clergyman Hudsonville 

1894 

G. Berkhof Deceased 

S. Broekstra . Deceased 

H. J. G. Dapper Deceased 

J. Vander Mey Educational Secretary Grand Rapids 

1895 

H. Beets Director of Missions Grand Rapids 

J. W. Brink Missionary Rehoboth, N. M. 

M. De Boer Deceased 

D. R. Drukker Clergyman Zeeland 

J. Smitter Clergyman Lansing, 111. 

J. Timmerman Clergyman Pa'erson, N. J. 

I. Van Dellen Clergyman Denver, Col. 

1896 

M. Borduin Clergyman Galesburg, la. 

H. Frijling Missionary Zuni, N. M. 

A. Vander Velde Vander Bok . . Deceased 

1897 

W. De Groot Clergyman Oostburg, Wis. 

P. Jonker. Sr Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

H. Kamps Clergyman (Emeritus) Zeeland 

T. Vander Ark Clergyman Manhattan, Mont. 

W. D. Vander Werp Clergyman Drenthe 

T. Van't Loo Clergyman (Emeritus) McBain 

G. Westenberg Clergyman Cleveland, Ohio 

J. Wiebenga Clergyman New Jersey 

1898 

R. L. Haan Clergyman Orange City, la. 

W. Kole Clergyman Goshen, Ind. 

D. Vander Ploeg Deceased 

D. Vander Wagen Grand Rapids 

72 



1899 

H. Ahuis Clergyman Meekin, 111. 

J. Bolt Missionary Crown Point, N. M. 

A. J. Brink Clergyman (Emeritus) Lynden, Wash. 

F. Doezema Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

J. B. Jonkman Deceased 

S. S. Vander Heide Clergyman Passaic, N. J. 

H. M. Vander Ploeg Clergyman Muskegon 

E. Van Korlaar Clergyman (Emeritus) Grand Rapids 

1900 

L. Berkhof Professor Grand Rapids 

M. J. Bosma Deceased 

L. P. Brink Missionary Crozier, N. M. 

J. E. De Groot Deceased 

H. Keegstra Clergyman Holland 

R. Diephuis Clergyman Alto, Wis. 

J. L. Van Tielen Clergyman Muskegon 

1901 

W. Borgman Clergyman Lucas 

J. A. Gerritsen Clergyman Conrad, Mont. 

G. J. Haan Clergyman Kalamazoo 

F. Stuart Deceased 

W. Veenstra Deceased 

L. Veltkamp Clergyman Grand Rapids 

1902 

W. Bode College President Grundy Center, la. 

M. Botbyl Clergyman Cleveland, Ohio 

J. R. Brink Clergyman Grand Rapids 

N. Burggraaf Clergyman Muskegon 

W. P. Van Wyk Clergyman Grand Rapids 

1903 

R. Bolt Clergyman Graafschap 

A. E. Broene Professor Grand Rapids 

J. Dolfin Clergyman Muskegon 

E. J. Krohne Clergyman Borculo 

B. Nagel Clergyman . . Chandler, Minn. 

J. Walkotten Clergyman Paterson, N. J. 

1904 
P. Bloem Clergyman Oskaloosa, la. 

C. De Leeuw Clergyman Sioux Center, la. 

H. J. Haarsma Clergyman Racine, Wis. 

H. J. Heynen Clergyman Carnes, la. 

J. Holwerda Clergyman Paterson, N. J. 

J. C. Schaap Clergyman Holland 

M. Vander Heide Clergyman Hospers, la. 

P. D. Van Vliet Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

S. Volbeda Professor Grand Rapids 

E. Ypma Clergyman Worthington, Minn. 

1905 

Y. P. De Jong Clergyman Grand Rapids 

J. J. Hiemenga College President Grand Rapids 

P. J. Hoekenga Clergyman Ripon, Cal. 

J. Homan Clergyman Vogel Center 

H. Tuls Clergyman Zutphen 

J. B. Vanden Hoek Clergyman Hills, Minn. 

73 



1906 

J. M. Byleveld Clergyman New Holland, S. Dak. 

J. Bruinooge Clergyman Crisp 

H. Dekker Clergyman Ada 

S. Eldersveld Clergyman Corsica, S. Dak. 

D. H. Kromminga Professor Grundy Center 

E. J. Tuuk Clergyman . Chicago, 111. 

1907 

J. H. Beld Clergyman Parkersburg, la. 

G. W. Hylkema Clergyman . . . Chicago, 111. 

H. J. Kuiper Clergyman Grand Rapids 

1908 

D. De Beer Clergyman Passaic, N. J. 

J. De Jonge Clergyman Hanford, Cal. 

J. M. Ghysels Clergyman Holland 

H. Guikema Clergyman South Holland, 111. 

J. A. Kett Deceased 

J. H. Mokma Clergyman Fremont 

H. J. Mulder Clergyman Lafayette, Ind. 

D. H. Muyskens Clergyman Sultan, Wash. 

J. A. Rottier Clergyman Beaverdam 

C. Vriesman Clergyman Everett, Wash. 

1909 

A. Bliek Clergyman Edgerton, Minn. 

H. J. De Vries Clergyman (Emeritus) Denver, Col. 

A. Guikema Clergyman Harrison, S. Dak. 

L. S. Huizenga Missionary China 

L. J. Lamberts Clergyman Fremont 

C. Maring Clergyman Otley, la. 

J. M. Voortman Clergyman Leighton, la. 

J. J. Weersing Clergyman Hull, Iowa 

1910 

H. Bakker Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

H. Danhof Clergyman Kalamazoo 

J. H. Geerlings Clergyman East Saugatuck 

K. Gelderloos Clergyman Noblef ord, Alta, Canada 

J. Haveman Clergyman Sully, la. 

P. A. Hoekstra Clergyman Grand Rapids 

D. Hollebeek Clergyman Sanborn, la. 

A. J. Rus Clergyman Falmouth 

E. J. Tanis Clergyman Grand Rapids 

1911 

J. C. De Bruin Clergyman Hull, N. Dak. 

P. W. De Jonge Clergyman Kenosha, Wis. 

K. W. Fortuin Clergyman Passaic, N. J. 

G. Hoeksema Clergyman Grand Rapids 

R. B. Kuiper Clergyman Grand Rapids 

H. Meeter Clergyman Grand Rapids 

W. Meyer Clergyman Crookston, Minn. 

J. Mulder Clergyman Luctor, Kans. 

H. E. Oostendorp Clergyman • • • Zeela " d 

M. M. Schans Clergyman Kelloggsville 

G. I. Vander Riet Clergyman • • • •• -Ovensel 

J. Vissia Clergyman (Emeritus) Redlands, Cal. 

B. Zwaagman Clergyman ^Wl* 11 j 

D. Zwier Clergyman Holland 

74 



1912 

H. K. Beute Clergyman Ellsworth 

H. Bultema Clergyman Muskegon 

A. Dekker Deceased 

f . L. Heeres Clergyman Reeman 

W. P. Heeres Deceased 

1913 

A. H. Brat Clergyman Platte, S. Dak. 

H. Kuiper Clergyman Rock Valley, la. 

Z. J. Sherda Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

W. M. Trap Student Ann Arbor 

J. Vander Lune Clergyman Pease, Minn. 

1914 

H. Bel Clergyman Muskegon 

K. Bergsma Clergyman Grand Rapids 

J. O. Bouwsma Clergyman Rusk 

C. Cooper Clergyman Willard, Ohio 

J. Dykstra Deceased 

H. Heyns Clergyman East Paris 

J. Kolkman Clergyman Grant 

W. Kuipers Clergyman Oakland 

J. D. Pikaart Clergyman North Blendon 

R. Posthumus Clergyman Bishop 

L. Trap Clergyman West Sayville, N. Y. 

J. Vander Kief t Clergyman Holland 

R. Veldman Clergyman Paterson, N. J. 

1915 

W. Bajema Clergyman Randolph, Wis. 

N. Fokkens Clergyman Ocheyedan, Minn. 

H. Hoeksema Clergyman Grand Rapids 

P. Jonker, Jr Clergyman Grand Rapids 

H. J. Ruys Clergyman Edmonton, Canada 

P. Van Beek, Jr Professor Hull, Iowa 

P. Van Dyk Clergyman Peoria, Iowa 

A. Wassink Clergyman Brooten, Minn. 

1916 

Jacob Cupido Clergyman Redlands, Cal. 

John H. Gruessing Deceased 

Nicholas Jansen Clergyman Hawarden, la. 

Diedrich H. Plesscher Clergyman Ackley, la. 

William Terpsma Clergyman Ireton, la. 

1917 

John P. Battema Clergyman Kalamazoo 

Clarence Bouma Graduate Student Cambridge, Mass. 

Samuel G. Brondsema Clergyman Colton, S. Dak. 

John C. De Korne Missionary China 

Joseph P. De Vries Clergyman New Era 

Samuel J. Fopma Clergyman Caldwell 

Walze Groen Clergyman Grand Haven 

John Clover Monsma Chicago, 111. 

Johan H. Monsma Missionary Paterson, N. J. 

Dirk Weidenaar Clergyman Arpin, Wis. 

Isaac Westra Clergyman Middleburg, la. 

75 



1918 

Tice De Boer Clergyman Winnipeg, Canada 

John De Jong Clergyman Zillah, Wash. 

John Dyk Clergyman Inwood, Iowa 

Dick Flietstra Clergyman Moline 

Herman Goodyk Clergyman McBain 

George Goris Clergyman Grand Haven 

Dick Jonker Clergyman Sibley, Iowa 

Benjamin Post Deceased 

Henry Schultze Professor Grundy Center, la. 

Henry Verduin Clergyman Lakeview, S. Dak. 

Joseph J. Werkman Clergyman Volga, S. Dak. 

Martin Wyngarden 

1919 

Harry Blystra Clergyman Sullivan 

Simon A. Dykstra Clergyman Baldwin, Wis. 

Andrew D. Folkema Clergyman Estelline, S. Dak. 

Gerhardus Holwerda Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

William J. Jonker Graduate Student Chicago, 111. 

Herman Moes Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

Richard H. Pousma Graduate Student Chicago, 111. 

Joseph Steigenga Clergyman Lebanon, la. 

Lambert Van Haitsma Clergyman Rudyard 

Albert B. Voss Clergyman Bemis, S. Dak. 

Peter Yff Clergyman Rochester, N. Y. 

1920 

Quirinus Breen Candidate Lynden, Wash. 

Andrew De Vries Clergyman Holland 

Harry A. Dykstra Missionary China 

Jacob Dewey Paauw Clergyman Adrian, Minn. 

Richard A. Rozeboom Graduate Student Princeton, N. J. 

Ralph Stob Professor Grand Rapids 

Johannes Van Beek Graduate Student Princeton, N. J. 

John Van den Hoek Clergyman Arpin, Wis. 

Henry Wierenga Clergyman Jamestown 

Eisse Harke Woldring Graduate Student Groningen, Neth. 



76 



ALUMNI OF THE COLLEGE 



1879 

H. Bode Deceased 

H. Douwstra Clerygman (Emeritus) Pella, Iowa 

J. Post Clergyman Cutlerville 

P. Schut Clergyman (Emeritus) Holland 

H. Tempel Deceased 

J. Vander Werp Clergyman Grand Haven 

1880 

P. Ekster Deceased 

1881 

E. Broene Deceased 

R. Drukker Deceased 

W. H. Van Leeuwen Insurance Grand Rapids 

1882 

P. Kosten Clergyman (Emeritus) Zeeland 

F. Wilandt Clergyman Lodi, N. J. 

1884 
W. J. Bloemendal Brick Layer Holland 

G. D. De Jong Clergyman Highland, Ind. 

A. Keizer Clergyman Harderwyk 

M. J. Marcusse Deceased 

H. Huizingh Deceased 

O. Stuit Deceased 

M. Van Vessem Clergyman Zeeland 

1885 
J. B. Hoekstra Clergyman Midland Park, N. J. 

1886 

A. W. Meyer Clergyman (Emeritus) Pease, Minn. 

J. N. Trompen Clergyman Aurora, Col. 

P. Van Vliet Deceased 

1887 

E. Breen Deceased 

J. Manni Clergyman Sheboygan, Wis. 

J. De Vries . Deceased 

J. Wyngarden Clergyman Walker 

1888 

J. Groen Clergyman Los Angeles, Cal. 

G. A. De Haan Deceased 

A. J. Vanden Heuvel Clergyman Twin Lakes 

1889 

G. Jansen Deceased 

S. Koster Clergyman Firth, Neb. 

T. L. De Lange Clergyman Valley Springs, S. Dak. 

77 



1890 

P. Bakker Deceased 

B. H. Einink Clergyman Holland 

G. G. Haan Clergyman Pella, Iowa 

H. Walkotten Clergyman Hudsonville 

1891 

G. Berkhof Deceased 

M. De Boer Deceased ,. 

S. Broekstra Deceased 

L. Colyn Clergyman 

J. Vander Mey Clergyman Grand Rapids 

1892 

H. Beets Clergyman (Director of Missions) Grand Rapids 

J. W. Brink Missionary Rehoboth, N. M. 

D. R. Drukker Clergyman Zeeland 

J. Smitter Clergyman Lansing, 111. 

J. Timmermann Clergyman Paterson, N. J. 

1893 
A. V. Vanden Bok Deceased 



M. Borduin . Clergyman Galesburg, Iowa 

H. Fryling Missionary Zuni, N. M. 

S. Vander Werf Clergyman Holland 

W. Wolvius Clergyman Kalamazoo 

1894 

W. De Groot Clergyman Oostburg, Wis. 

P. Jonker, Sr Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

H. Kamps Clergyman (Emeritus) Zeeland 

T. Vander Ark Clergyman Manhattan, Mont. 

D. Vander Wagen Grand Rapids 

W. D. Vander Werp Clergyman Drenthe 

T. Van Het Loo Clergyman (Emeritus) McBain 

G. Westenberg Clergyman Cleveland, Ohio 

J. Wiebenga Clergyman 

1895 

S. Bouma Clergyman Oak Lawn, III. 

J. De Groot Deceased 

R. Diephuis Clergyman Waupun, Wis. 

H. Frieling Clergyman Fulton, 111. 

R. L. Haan Clergyman Orange City, Iowa 

S. Holkeboer Deceased 

W. Kole Clergyman Goshen, Ind. 

E. Van Korlaar Clergyman (Emeritus) Grand Rapids 

D. Vander Ploeg Deceased 

A. Vander Werf Clergyman Friesland, Wis. 

1896 

H. Ahuis Clergyman Ridot, 111. 

J. Bolt Missionary Crown Point, N. M. 

A. J. Brink Clergyman (Emeritus) Lynden, Wash. 

F. Doezema Clergyman . Chicago, 111. 

J. B. Jonkman Deceased 

S. S. Vander Heide Clergyman Passaic, N. J. 

H. Vander Ploeg Clergyman Muskegon 

78 



1897 

L. Berkhof Professor Grand Rapids 

M. J. Bosma Deceased 

L. P. Brink Missionary Crozier, N. M. 

H. Keegstra Clergyman Holland 

J. L. Van Tielen Clergyman Muskegon 

1898 

W. Borgman Clergyman Lucas 

M. Botbyl Clergyman Cleveland, Ohio 

N. Burggraaf Clergyman Muskegon 

J. A. Gerritsen Clergyman Conrad, Mont. 

G. J. Haan Clergyman Kalamazoo 

F. Stuart Deceased 

W. Stuart Clergyman Grand Rapids 

L. Veltkamp Clergyman Grand Rapids 

W. Veenstra Deceased 

1899 

J. R. Brink Clergyman Grand Rapids 

W. P. Van Wyk Clergyman Grand Rapids 

1900 

R. Bolt Clergyman Graafschap 

J. Dolfin Clergyman Muskegon 

E. J. Krohne Clergyman Borculo 

B. Nagel Clergyman Chandler, Minn. 

J. B. Vanden Hoek Clergyman Hills, Minn. 

J. Walkotten Clergyman Paterson, N. J. 

1901 

Peter Bloem Clergyman Oskaloosa, Iowa 

Cornelius De Leeuw Clergyman Sioux Center, Iowa 

Henry J. Haarsma Clergyman Racine, Wis. 

Henry J. Heynen Clergyman Carnes, la. 

Jacob Holwerda Clergyman Paterson, N. J. 

John C. Schaap Clergyman Holland 

Meine Vander Heide Clergyman Hospers, Iowa 

Peter D. Van Vliet Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

Samuel Volbeda Professor Grand Rapids 

Lambert Ypma Clergyman Worthington, Minn. 

1902 

John Harm Beld Clergyman Parkersburg, Iowa 

Ymen P. De Jong Clergyman Grand Rapids 

John J. Hiemenga College President Grand Rapids 

Peter Jacob Hoekenga Clergyman Ripon, Calif. 

Herman Tuls Clergyman Zutphen 

1903 

John M. Byleveld Clergyman New Holland, S. Dak. 

James Bruinooge Clergyman Crisp 

Henry Dekker Clergyman Cincinnati, Ohio 

Samuel Eldersveld Clergyman Corsica, S. Dak. 

Diedrich Hinrich Kromminga. . . . Professor Grundy Center, Iowa 

Edward J. Tuuk Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

1904 

George Walter Hylkema Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

Henry J. Kuiper Clergyman Grand Rapids 

79 



1905 

Dirk De Beer Clergyman Passaic, N. J. 

John De Jonge Clergyman Hanford, Calif. 

Nicholas J. Dykema Deceased 

James M. Ghysels Clergyman Holland 

Henry Guikema Clergyman South Holland, 111. 

John A. Kelt Deceased 

John H. Mokma Clergyman Fremont 

Henry J. Mulder Clergyman Lafayette, Ind. 

John A. Rottier Clergyman Beaverdam 

Cornelius Vriesman Clergyman Everett, Wash. 

1906 

Abraham Bliek Clergyman Edgerton, Minn. 

Henry J. De Vries Clergyman (Emeritus) Denver, Colo. 

Arend Guikema Clergyman Harrison, S. Dak. 

Lee S. Huizenga Missionary China 

Lambertus J. Lamberts Clergyman Fremont 

Cornelius Maring Clergyman Otley, Iowa 

John M. Voortman Clergyman Leighton, Iowa 

1907 

Henry Bakker Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

Henry Danhof Clergyman Kalamazoo 

Jacob C. De Bruyn Clergyman Hull, N. Dak. 

John H. Geerlings Clergyman East Saugatuck 

Nicholas Gelderloos Clergyman Nobleford, Alta, Canada 

John Haveman Clergyman Sully, Iowa 

Dick Hollebeek Clergyman Sanborn, Iowa 

Henry W. Korf ker Deceased 

Alletinus J. Rus Clergyman Falmouth 

Edward James Tanis Clergyman Grand Rapids 

1908 

Albert H. Brat Clergyman Platte, S. Dak. 

Peter W. De Jonge Clergyman Kenosha, Wis. 

Karl Wilhelm Fortuin Clergyman Passaic, N. J. 

Gerrit Hoeksema Clergyman Grand Rapids 

Peter Hoekstra Professor Grand Rapids 

H. Henry Meeter Clergyman Grand Rapids 

John Meeter Deceased 

William Meyer Clergyman Crooks'.on, Minn. 

Jacob Mulder Clergyman Luctor, Kansas 

Herman E. Oostendorp Clergyman Zeeland 

Martin M. Schans Clergyman Kelloggsville 

G. John Vande Riet Clergyman Overisel 

John P. Van Haitsma Professor Grand Rapids 

Jacob Vissia Clergyman (Emeritus) Redlands, Cal. 

Benjamin Zwaagman Clergyman Marion 

Daniel Zwier Clergyman Holland 

1909 

Hiram K. Beute Clergyman Ellsworth 

Harry Bultema Clergyman Muskegon 

George J. Deur Teacher Highland, Ind. 

William B. Eerdmans Bookdealer Grand Rapids 

Jacob L. Heeres Clergyman Reeman 

Walter P. Heeres Deceased 

James Hietbrink Teacher Denver, Colo. 

Johannes B. Hulst Lay Preacher Grand Rapids 

80 



1910 

Clarence Cooper Clergyman Willard, Ohio 

John J. Kok 

William Kuipers Clergyman Oakland 

Richard Poslhumus Clergyman Bishop 

Zacharias J. Sherda Clergyman Evergreen Park, 111. 

John A. Slruyk Clergyman Little Falls, N. J. 

William M. Trap Student Ann Arbor 

John Kolkman Clergyman Grant 

John D. Pikaart Clergyman North Blendon 

John G. Vande Lune Clergyman Pease, Minn. 

1911 

John O. Bouwsma Clergyman Rusk 

Herman Heyns Clergyman East Paris 

John M. Vande Kieft Clergyman Prairie City, Iowa 

Herman Bel Clergyman Muskegon 

Karst Bergsma Clergyman Grand Rapids 

Thomas De Loof Atlanta, Ga. 

Jurjen Dykstra Deceased 

Garrett Heyns Principal of Academy Hull, Iowa 

John Evert Luidens Deceased 

Jacob D. Mulder Medical Missionary Rehoboth, N. Mex. 

Teunis Oldenburger Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

Martin Wyngarden Graduate Student Philadelphia, Pa. 

Leonard Trap Clergyman West Sayville, N. Y. 

Henry J. Ruys Clergyman Edmonton,, Canada 

Richard Veldman Clergyman Paterson, N. J. 

1912 

John H. Muyskens Graduate Student Ann Arbor 

Hessel Bouma Clergyman Paterson, N. J. 

Nicholas Fokkens Clergyman Ocheyedan, Iowa 

Watze Groen Clergyman Grand Haven 

Herman Hoeksema Clergyman Grand Rapids 

Peter Jonker, Jr Clergyman Grand Rapids 

Lee Kiel Physician Chicago, 111. 

Harm Albert Pilon Teacher Chicago, 111. 

Peter Van Beek Professor Hull, Iowa 

William Van Vliet Professor Hull, Iowa 

Albert Wassink Clergyman Brooten, Minn. 

William Bajema Clergyman Randolph, Wis. 

Peter Van Dyke Clergyman Peoria, Iowa 

1913 

Nicholas Jansen Clergyman Hawarden, Iowa 

Jacob Martin Olthoff Professor Grand Rapids 

Diedrich H. Plesscher Clergyman Ackley, Iowa 

Martin Van Dyke Graduate Student Princeton, N. J. 

Dick Weidenaar Clergyman Plover, Wis. 

Herman Wyngarden Graduate Student Ann Arbor 

John H. Gruessing Deceased 

William Terpsma Clergyman Ireton, Iowa 

1914 

Clarence Bouma Graduate Student Cambridge, Mass. 

John C. De Korne Missionary China 

William Harry Jellema Professor Grand Rapids 

John Ramaker Graduate Student. . . .South Glastonbury, Conn. 

John P. Battema Clergyman Kalamazoo 

81 



Samuel G. Brondsema Clergyman Colton, S. Dak. 

Joseph P. De Vries Clergyman New Era 

Samuel J. Fopma Clergyman Caldwell 

John Clover Monsma Editor Chicago, 111. 

John Henry Monsma Clergyman Paterson, N. J. 

George Robbert Teacher Mercersberg, Pa. 

Isaac Westra Clergyman Middelburg, Iowa 

John Dyk Clergyman Inwood, Iowa 

Jacob Cupido Clergyman Redlands, Calif. 

1915 

Ernest Beernink Medical Student Ann Arbor 

Edward Joseph Bouwsma Business Muskegon 

Minkus Fakkema Principal of High School Chicago, 111. 

George Goris Clergyman 

Henry C. Ryskamp Professor Grand Rapids 

Jacob E. Smitter Teacher Grand Rapids 

Ralph Stob Professor Grand Rapids 

Henry Verduin Clergyman Lakeview, S. Dak. 

Peter Dekker Teacher Hospers, Iowa 

Cornelius Dolfin Clergyman Hudsonville 

Frank James Driesens Principal of High School Grand Rapids 

Benjamin Engbers Principal of School Kalamazoo 

Dirk Flietstra Clergyman Moline 

Andrew Folkema Clergyman Estelline, S. Dak. 

Herman Goodyk Clergyman McBain 

Dirk Jonker Clergyman Sibley, Iowa 

John Masselink Clergyman Fulton, III. 

Benjamin Post Deceased 

Richard H. Pousma Graduate Student Chicago, 111. 

Wesley Prince Clergyman Davenport, Wash. 

Henry Schultze Professor Grundy Center, Iowa 

Ben H. Smit Teacher Beaverdam 

Joseph J. Werkman Clergyman Volga, S. Dak. 

Tice De Boer Clergyman Winnipeg, Canada 

John De Jong Clergyman Zillah, Wash. 

Herman Henry Schultz Missionary Paterson, N. J. 

1916 

Simon A. Dykstra Clergyman Baldwin, Wis. 

Gerhardus J. Holwerda Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

Herman Moes Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

Joseph Steigenga Clergyman Lebanon, Iowa 

Lambert Van Haitsma Clergyman Rudyard 

Harry Blystra Clergyman Sullivan 

John De Haan Principal of School Kalamazoo 

William John Jonker Medical Student University of Chicago 

Albert Bernard Voss Clergyman Bemis, S. Dak. 

John Vanden Hoek Clergyman Arpin, Wis. 

1917 

Jacob Bajema Professor Grundy Center, Iowa 

Quirinus Breen Candidate Lynden, Wash. 

Andrew De Vries Clergyman Holland 

Dewey Ralph Heetderks Medical Student University of Michigan 

Theodore John Kreps Student University of Colorado 

John Medendorp Theological Student Grand Rapids 

82 



Jacob Paauw Clergyman Adrian, Minn. 

Lillian Winnifred Peet Teacher Fremont 

Richard A. Rozeboom Graduate Student Princeton, N. J. 

John Bernard Schoolland Teacher Grand Rapids 

Benjamin H. Spalink Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Johannes Van Beek Graduate Student Princeton, N. J. 

Henry Wierenga Clergyman Jamestown 

Harry A. Dykstra Missionary China 

Henry J. Kuiper Teacher Sully, Iowa 

Joseph Vande Kieft Farmer Tracy, Iowa 

Eisse Harke Woldring Student Groningen, Neth. 

1918 

John Breuker Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Ralph Bronkema High School Teacher Grand Rapids 

John De Haan Theological Student Grand Rapids 

John S. Dykstra Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Benjamin Essenburg Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Peter G. J. Goeree Theological Student Grand Rapids 

William Goudberg Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Corneal Holtrop Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Edward Joling Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Elbert E. Kooistra Theological Student Grand Rapids 

George M. Ophoff Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Edward Bernard Pekelder Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Charles Spoelhof Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Harm Vander Woude Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Jacob R. Van Dyke Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Emo F. J. Van Halsema Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Frederick H. Wezeman Theological Student Grand Rapids 

1919 

Edward Boeve Theological Student Grand Rapids 

William J. Bossenbroek High School Teacher Chicago, 111. 

Oscar Kolk Bouwsma Graduate Student Ann Arbor 

Jacob H. Bruinooge Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Otto De Jong Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Peter G. Dykhuizen Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Johan R. Euwema Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Nicholas J. Monsma Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Edward Van Farowe Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Herman Van Lunen Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Cornelius Van Reenen Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Harry Vork Principal of School Fremont 

John Zeeuw Theological Student Grand Rapids 

1920 

Garret Andre Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Isaac Couwenhoven Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Paul De Koekkoek Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Herman H. Dykhouse Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Garret Hofmeyer theological Student Grand Rapids 

Jacob H. Joldersma Theological Student Grand Rapids 

John L. Koert Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Herman Koning Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Cornelius J. Scholten Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Albert H. Smit Theological Student Grand Rapids 

83 



Paul Van Dyken Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Lambertus Van Laar Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Gerben M. Zylstra Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Clarence Thomas De Graaf College Student Grand Rapids 

William Albert De Jonge College Student Grand Rapids 

Matthys H. De Vroome College Student Grand Rapids 

Elton J. Holtrop Theological Student Grand Rapids 

Martin Seven High School Teacher Grand Rapids 

Harry Vander Kamp Medical Student Ann Arbor 



84 



ALUMNI OF PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



1904 

James Marinus Ghysels Clergyman . = Holland 

Peter Hoekstra Professor Grand Rapids 

George W. Hylkema Clergyman Chicago, 111. 

John Evert Luidens Deceased 

Frank Vanden Berg Teacher Grand Rapids 

John P. Van Haitsma Professor Grand Rapids 

1905 

Anna Groendyke At Home Grand Rapids 

Cornelius Keegstra Office Clerk Grand Rapids 

John W. Olthouse Professor Wooster, Ohio 

David Van Strien Missionary Tokyo, 



1906 

Sarah Albers-Voss Bemis, S. Dak. 

Winnie Boermans-Smit Grand Rapids 

Marguerite Bouma-Van Slooten Grand Rapids 

Diena S. Broekstra-Vander Lune Pease, Minn. 

Mattie Cramer-Oom Grand Rapids 

Jennie Damminga Teacher Muskegon Heights 

Dena Driesens-Vissia Redlands, Cal. 

Alice Haverkamp Teacher Grand Rapids 

Henrietta E. Hielkema Deceased 

Henry Kuiper Teacher Chicago, 111. 

H. Henry Meeter Clergyman Grand Rapids 

Edward Postema Teacher Hull, Iowa 

Jennie Scherphorn-Sluyter West Chester, Pa. 

George Van Rhee Physician Detroit 

Anna Wierenga-Bruinsma Chicago, 111. 

1907 

Richard Boonstra Deceased 

Cora De Witt Teacher Holland 

Mamie De Witt-Venhuizen Grand Rapids 

Anna Franken-Broene Grand Rapids 

Brittina Jane Root-Boone Zeeland 

Harry Lieffers Physician Grand Rapids 

Lambert Van Haitsma Clergyman Rudyard 

Walter Van Haitsma Michigan Agricultural College Lansing 

1908 

Christian Aue Teacher Orange City, Iowa 

John Bouwsma Clergyman Rusk 

Frank James Driesens Principal of High School Grand Rapids 

Mary Groen-Muyskens Ann Arbor 

Gabriel Heyboer Dentist Chicago, III. 

Herman Heyns Clergyman East Paris 

Grace Lindemulder At Home Grand Rapids 

Martin Meeter Business Lansing, 111. 

Anthony Tilma Business Kalamazoo 

Edward Vander Vries Real Estate and Banking Tucson, Ariz. 

85 



Nellie Vander Weg-Bruggink Grand Rapids 

Rutherford Van Vliet Supt. of Gas Company Mobile, Ala. 

1909 

Henrietta W. Bosman-Smit Music Teacher Grand Rapids 

Thomas De Loof Atlanta, Ga. 

Garret Heyns Principal of Academy Hull, Iowa 

Henry Vande Riet Principal of School Sioux Center, Iowa 

Alieda S. Van Vessem- Van Wesep New York 

Henry Van Wesep With Rockefeller Institute New York 

Trena Venema Teacher Grand Rapids 

Martin Wyngarden Graduate Student Philadelphia, Pa. 

1910 

Josie Boss-Kuiper Rock Valley, Iowa 

Cora Evelyn Brandt At Home Grand Rapids 

Francina De Witt- Vinkemulder Rudyard 

Watze Groen Clergyman Grand Haven 

John Hoffman Cashier of Bank Grand Haven 

William Harry Jellema Professor Grand Rapids 

Anna Kooistra-Meindertsma Lamont 

Jacob M. Olthoff Professor Grand Rapids 

Harm Albert Pilon Teacher Chicago, 111. 

Henry C. Ryskamp Professor Grand Rapids 

J. Anthony Vanden Bosch Dentist Grand Rapids 

Wilhelmina Zaagman-Hoekstra Grand Rapids 

1911 

John De Jager Principal of School Grand Rapids 

Adriana Hartigh Teacher Grand Rapids 

Gerrit Keizer Law Student Chicago, 111. 

Edith Kuiper- Vanden Hoek Arpin, Wis. 

Otto C. Lenters Business Chicago, 111. 

Annette Lindemulder At Home Grand Rapids 

Tessie May Luidens-Bouma Cambridge, Mass. 

Tillie Mulder-Paap Ada 

Anna Ploeg- Van Laan Grand Rapids 

Clarissa H. Rooks Teacher Chicago, 111. 

Kathryn Venema-Sikkema Lucas 

Herman Wyngarden Graduate Student Ann Arbor 

Helen May Zandstra Principal of School Grand Rapids 

1912 

Jacob Bajema Professor Grundy Center, Iowa 

Ella Helena Berg Teacher Grand Rapids 

Alice Brandt- Vander Slagh Hudsonville 

Cora Elhart Teacher Grand Rapids 

Susan Hofstra Principal of School Zeeland 

Frank Kuiper Teacher Grand Rapids 

Herman Lankheet Deceased ......;. . 

Johanna Helen Noordewier Student Chicago, 111. 

Berend H. Smit Teacher Beaverdam 

Jacob E. Smitter Teacher Grand Rapids 

Joseph Vande Kieft Farmer Tracy, Iowa 

Delia Vanden Hoek-Brondsema Colton, S. Dak. 

Gerald W. Van Keppel Bookkeeper . Muskegon 

Henry M. Wagoner Teacher Grand Rapids 

Jay L. Zandstra Business Detroit 

86 



1913 

Josie Baker Teacher Rehoboth 

Florence Boersma-Moes Chicago, 111. 

Gerrit Bylsma Carpenter Grand Rapids 

John De Haan Principal of School Kalamazoo 

Benjamin Engbers Principal of School Kalamazoo 

Ella H. Hofstra-Bronkema Grand Rapids 

Richard Hommes Teacher Passaic, N. J. 

Henry A. Kuiper Deceased 

Henry J. Kuiper Teacher Sully, Iowa 

Jennie Molenbeek Teacher Grand Rapids 

Emo F. J. Van Halsema Student Grand Rapids 

Elizabeth C. Van Westenbrugge-Hertel Grand Rapids 

A. Rubey W. De Korne-Van Houten Grand Rapids 

Irene Sytsma Teacher Grand Rapids 

Marie C. Tiddens-Dice Grand Rapids 

1914 

Stanley Albers Business Niles 

Win, Martin Alwynse Teacher Prinsburg, Minn. 

Henry Nicholas Beets Teacher Tulsa, Okla. 

Tena Bolthouse Teacher Grand Rapids 

Quirinus Breen Candidate Lynden, Wash. 

Andrew De Vries Clergyman Holland 

Lambert J. Flokstra Teacher Chicago, 111. 

John Holwerda Business Grand Rapids 

Dora F. Hulst-De Ruischer Paterson, N. J. 

Wm. John Jonker Student Chicago, 111. 

Clarence Knol Foreman Grand Rajpids 

Dora Knol-Schildroth Detroit 

Theodore John Kreps Student Boulder, Colo. 

Henrietta Kuiper Teacher Grand Rapids 

John Medendorp Student Grand Rapids 

Jacob Paauw Clergyman Adrian, Minn. 

Barney Peterson Teacher Moline 

Bernard Robbert . Business Holland 

John Robbert Student Holland 

Richard Rozeboom Student Princeton, N. J. 

Katie Soodsma-Klooster Munster, Ind. 

John Bernard Schoolland Teacher Grand Rapids 

Benjamin Spalink Student Grand Rapids 

Janet Vande Kief t Teacher Pella, Iowa 

Minnie Vande Kief t Teacher Pella, Iowa 

Hattie Vande Riet-Battjes Grand Rapids 

Johannes Van Beek Student Princeton, N. J. 

John Van Oosten Student Ann Arbor 

Ralph G. Vander Laan Stenographer Grand Rapids 

Henry Wierenga Clergyman Jamestdwn 

1915 

Herman Ballast Teacher Chicago, 111. 

Nellie Beekman-Burmania Randolph, Wis. 

Maurice Brandt Bank Clerk Grand Rapids 

Ralph Bronkema Teacher Grand Rapids 

Guy De Boer Student Ann Arbor 

Leo Dice Bookkeeper Toledo, Ohio 

Harry A. Dykstra Missionary China 

John S. Dykstra Student Grand Rapids 

Benjamin Essenburg Student Grand Rapids 

87 



William Goudberg Student Grand Rapids 

Catherine Hennink Teacher Grand Rapids 

Benjamin Hertel Architect Grand Rapids 

Lewis Bert Hoeksema . Muskegon 

Martha Hoekstra At Home Midland Park, N. J. 

Edward Joling Student Grand Rapids 

John Jonker Business Chicago, 111. . 

Albert E. Kooislra Student Grand Rapids 

John Kuiper Student Grand Rapids 

Dennis Langeland Grand Rapids 

Albert H. Muyskens Teacher Ireton, Iowa 

Egbert Ralph Post Student Ann Arbor 

Helen Schoonbeek-Pekelder . . . .Teacher Grand Rapids 

Catherine Schut Teacher Grand Rapids 

Dick Siersema Student Ann Arbor 

John Egbert Smitter Business Grand Rapids 

Amy Vanden Bosch Teacher of History Chicago, 111. 

Harm Vander Woude Student Grand Rapids 

Mary Van Wesep Teacher Zeeland 

Cornelia Veltkamp-Dykstra Baldwin, Wis. 

Everdean Kalkotten Teacher Grand Rapids 

Harry Thomas Winsemius Graduate Student Ann Arbor 

1916 

Edward Boeve Student Grand Rapids 

William J. Bossenbroek Teacher Chicago, 111. 

Oscar K. Bouwsma Graduate Student Ann Arbor 

John Breuker Student Grand Rapids 

Jacob H. Bruinooge Student Grand Rapids 

Catherine Cramer Teacher Kalamazoo 

Olto De Jong Student Grand Rapids 

Cornelius De Ruischer Teacher Paterson, N. J. 

Fannie Eisen-Mohr Allendale 

Venna Eelman-Lemmen Allendale 

Johann R. Euwema Student Grand Rapids 

Agnes Hofstra . Teacher Grand Rapids 

Arnold William Hulst Student Grand Rapids 

John Henry Husselman Cleveland, Ohio 

Hadie Jansma Teacher Grand Rapids 

John F. Jellema Teacher Holland 

Marie Koppers Teacher Grand Rapids 

George H. Masselink Student Iowa City, Iowa 

William Masselink Graduate Student Princeton, N. J. 

Nicholas J. Monsma Student Grand Rapids 

Deanetta Ploeg Nurse Grand Rapids 

Henrietta Ploeg Teacher Grand Rapids 

Cornelius M. Schoolland Student Grand Rapids 

Elizabeth Vermeer Teacher Grand Rapids 

Harry Vork Principal of School Fremont 

Hattie Wassen Teacher Leo':a, Minn. 

1917 

William Alkema Student Grand Rapids 

Garret Andre Student Grand Rapids 

Gertrude Brouwer Teacher Hull, Iowa 

Louis Albert Brunsting Student Ann Arbor 

Clarence Thomas De Graaf Student Grand Rapids 

Flora Eleanor De Graaf Teacher Grand Rapids 

88 



John Ralph De Haan Bank Clerk Grand Rapids 

William Albert De Jonge Student Grand Rapids 

Matthys H. De Vroome Student Grand Rapids 

Elsie Hazel De Young Teacher Grand Rapids 

Herman H. Dykhouse Student Grand Rapids 

John G. Hoekman Teacher New Holland, S. Dak. 

Garret Hofmeyer Student Grand Rapids 

Jacob H. Joldersma Student Grand Rapids 

John L. Koert Student Grand Rapids 

Herman Koning . Student Grand Rapids 

Arthur Kuizema Teacher Chicago, 111. 

Albert Leeuwen Teacher Paterson, N. J. 

Cora Geraldine Molenbeek Teacher Grand Rapids 

Sadie Rodenhouse Teacher Grand Rapids 

Beatrice Blanche Schram-Vander Kooi, Teacher Grand Rapids 

Martin Seven Teacher Grand Rapids 

Gezena Marguerite Sevensma. . . .Stenographer Grand Rapids 

Albert Smit Student Grand Rapids 

Edward Vander Kamp Post Office Clerk Grand Rapids 

Harry Vander Kamp Student Ann Arbor 

Robert Vander Molen Teacher McBain 

Paul Van Dyken Student Grand Rapids 

Lambertus Van Laar Student Grand Rapids 

Dorothy Esther Winsemius-Bouwsma Muskegon 

Gerben Zylstra Student Grand Rapids 

1918 

Justin Harry Albers Business Niles 

Peter Gerrit Berkhout Student Grand Rapids 

David D. Bonnema Student Grand Rapids 

Ralph J. Bos Student Grand Rapids 

Herman J. Brink Student Grand Rapids 

Charles William Bulthuis Student Grand Rapids 

Helena Buren Teacher Harrison, S. Dak. 

Elsie Bylsma Teacher Grand Rapids 

Benjamin J. Danhof Student Grand Rapids 

Ruth De Haan- Van Houten Grand Rapids 

Paul De Koekkoek Student Grand Rapids 

John Jacob De Waard Student Grand Rapids 

Ida Dragt Teacher Grand Rapids 

Aldrich Dusseljee Student Grand Rapids 

Minnie Dykema Teacher Grand Rapids 

John Martin Dykstra Student Grand Rapids 

Richard Frens Student Grand Rapids 

John Gritter Student Grand Rapids 

Fred Haan Student Grand Rapids 

Anna Gertrude Haga Teacher Grand Rapids 

John Holwerda Student Grand Rapids 

William Holwerda Student Grand Rapids 

Melvin Rudolph Houseman Student Grand Rapids 

Cornelius Henry Ippel Teacher Lucas 

Cornelius Richard Jaarsma Principal of School Grand Rapids 

Richard Jacob Karsen Student Grand Rapids 

Richard Kass Teacher Baldwin, Wis. 

Simon Keyzer Teacher Edmonton, Canada 

Anthony Albert Koning Student Grand Rapids 

Edward Dennis Lampen Hamilton 

Dena Lemmen Teacher Coopersville 

89 



Martin Monsma Student Grand Rapids 

Joostina Penning Teacher Grand Rapids 

Garrit Roelofs Student Grand Rapids 

Cornelius J. Scholten Student Grand Rapids 

Helen Sietsema Teacher Beaverdam 

Edith Ella Stuit Teacher Grand Rapids 

Seymour Swets Student Grand Rapids 

Christian Henry Telman Student . Grand Rapids 

Johanna Ubbink Teacher Grand Rapids 

Gerrit T. Vander Lugt Student Grand Rapids 

Delia Vander Vennen Teacher Grand Rapids 

Albert Van Dyken Student Grand Rapids 

Grace Van Laar Teacher Rock Valley, Iowa 

Henry J. Van Laar Student Grand Rapids 

Cornelius Van Til Student Grand Rapids 

Helena Verspoor Teacher Grand Rapids 

Grace Vriesman Teacher Muskegon 

Harry Wassink Teacher Hudsonville 

1919 

John Beebe Student Grand Rapids 

Stuart Bergsma Student Grand Rapids 

John Ralph Bos Student Grand Rapids 

Angelyn Helen Bouwsma Student Grand Rapids 

Fred Bronkema Student Grand Rapids 

Ralph John Danhof Student Grand Rapids 

Anna Frances De Mol Student Grand Rapids 

George Eisenga Teacher Randolph, Wis. 

Emma Clarice Feenstra Stenographer Grand Rapids 

Catherine Marie Geisel Student Grand Rapids 

David Grasman . Student Grand Rapids 

Anna Mildred Heetderks Teacher Grand Rapids 

Sarah Heyns Teacher Grand Rapids 

John Hofstra Student Grand Rapids 

Christian Huissen Student Grand Rapids 

Winnif red Maxine Jurrians Teacher Baldwin, Wis. 

Ida Mae Kamp Student Detroit 

Edwin Y. Monsma Teacher Grand Rapids 

Marie Frances Peters Student Grand Rapids 

Martinus Pothoven Student Grand Rapids 

James Putt Student Grand Rapids 

John Rubingh Student Grand Rapids 

Marion Maggie Schoolland Teacher Grand Rapids 

Albert Henry Selles Student Grand Rapids 

Adrian Slings Student Grand Rapids 

Harriet Louise Stuit Nurse Grand Rapids 

Henry A. Swets Student Grand Rapids 

Henry J. Triezenberg Student Grand Rapids 

John James Van Heest Student Grand Rapids 

Daniel Van Houte Student Grand Rapids 

Frieda Marion Van Wesep Teacher Grand Rapids 

Dewey Westra Student Grand Rapids 

Garret Wyngarden Student Grand Rapids 

1920 

Harry Abma Student Grand Rapids 

Ary John Abrahams Student Grand Rapids 

William Clarence Beets Student Grand Rapids 

Jennie Boersma Student Grand Rapids 

90 



Menso R. Bolt Student Grand Rapids 

Nelly Jeanetle Bosma Student Grand Rarids 

Louis Bouma Student Grand Rapids 

Willemina Roberta Brink Teacher Grand Rapids 

Cecil De Boer Student Grand Rapids 

Mathilda De Boer Teacher Byron 

Sidney De Boer Clerk Detroit 

Nicholas De Vries Student Grand Rapids 

Clarence John Dykstra Teacher Pella, Iowa 

John Henry Gsurkink Student Grand Rapids 

Samuel James Greydanus Student Grand Rapids 

Mabel Groenveld Teacher Grand Rapids 

John Samuel Haitema Student Grand Rapids 

John G. Huizenga Teacher Munster, Ind. 

Hilda Given Jonker Teacher Lansing, 111. 

Wilhemina Marie Kloet Teacher Fremont 

John Cornelius Kruithof Student Grand Rapids 

John Orlebeke Student Grand Rapids 

Andrew Sail Student Grand Rapids 

John Louis Schaver Student Grand Rapids 

Elizabeth Spoelman-Ohlman Teacher Kalamazoo 

Peter Lambert Steen Student Grand Rapids 

John Swets Student Grand Rapids 

Caroline Louise Temple Student Grand Rapids 

Elizabeth Ten Hoor Student Grand Rapids 

Jeanette Hermina Timmer Los Angeles, Cal. 

Henry D. Van de Kieft Student Grand Rapids 

Sophia Dora Vander Kamp Teacher 

Carolyn Mae Vander Meer Student Grand Rapids 

Marvin John Vander Werp Student Grand Rapids 

Coral Van Dommelen Teacher Grand Rapids 

James D. Vos Student Holland 

Charles Wielenga Grand Rapids 

Herman Wierenga Student Grand Rapids 



91 



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